Foundation Diploma in Hospitality

Level 1 Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important Guided Learning Hours: 30 (25 for teaching and learning activities, 5 for assessment activities)

Unit aims
The wider hospitality industry and the seven industries within it, provide a stimulating and challenging world for you to study and work in. Through this unit, you will learn how the everyday lives of people are affected by the important contribution the hospitality industry makes to the UK economy and the local community you live in. You will discover how the world of tourism can affect the hospitality industry, as well as the impact that factors such as major events or natural disasters can have. This unit will include plenty of opportunities for you to visit real hospitality establishments and businesses to build your knowledge and understanding of the industry. During these visits and other learning opportunities, you will also have an opportunity to talk to industry specialists about the hospitality industry and the jobs they do within it.

Assessment Method
This unit is internally assessed.
The assessment for this unit involves planning and reviewing activities to demonstrate the learner’s knowledge and skills. Learners will be expected to take responsibility for their own role and adapt behaviour accordingly. For further information about the requirements for this unit, including controls teachers must refer to the ‘Internal Assessment Specification’. EDI have produced sample assessment material to further specify the requirements for centres.

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Learning Outcome

Learners will:

1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 1.1 Describe the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally. 1.2 Compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community. 1.3 Describe job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry

Learners need to develop understanding of the levels of revenue and employment generated by the hospitality industry on a local and national basis. This will include recognition that the level of employment opportunities reflects the growth of the hospitality industry. Furthermore, they develop their knowledge of how income from these jobs contributes to the economy by feeding back into businesses, for example: by providing jobs (front of house, such as; waiters, bar staff, event managers, receptionists and cruise line pursers and back of house, such as; chefs, maintenance, finance, marketing, human resources) by bringing visitors to the area (eg a local hotel targeting the business and conference market or a major sporting event bringing supporters from other areas) This should build on learners’ knowledge of the wider hospitality industry developed in unit 1, including the range of hospitality industries and the businesses within them. As well as contributing to the local economy, the hospitality industry is important to communities in various ways. Learners need to be able to compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community considering, for example, the importance of: providing venues for local people and visitors in the area to meet sourcing food and beverages through local providers supporting issues of local importance, such as developing tourism packages to support a local wildlife or hiking centre, sponsoring local clubs and societies supporting local schools by giving talks about hospitality and how it contributes to the local economy and community Learners need to explore and develop their understanding of real job roles that are undertaken in the local community across the range of hospitality industries. Additionally they should develop understanding of the earnings and rewards that the industry can offer including career progression and the chance to travel, both nationally and internationally.

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Learning outcome

Learners will:

2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 2.1 Describe the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area. 2.2 Identify the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry.

Learners need to develop understanding of how the local hospitality industry can be affected by the tourism industry and its component parts including: visitor attractions – eg cultural and heritage sites, museums and galleries, theme parks, national parks, sporting venues, gardens, wildlife parks and zoos entertainment – eg sporting events, concerts, theatres, outdoor festivals facilities – eg transport (air/coach/train/taxi operators and associated terminals), Tourist Information Centres, travel agents and tour operators Learners should develop knowledge of how other factors affect both the local and national hospitality industry, for example: natural disasters – foreign tourists are reluctant to visit those areas affected transport links interrupted – flights delayed by poor weather causes guests to arrive late increase in demand for hotel rooms when major events are held locally the threat of terrorism in different countries and locations

A range of examples are included in this unit, however, this is not an exhaustive list and centres can use additional examples where appropriate.

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Learning Outcome Learners will: 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 3.1 Use sources of information to answer questions.

Learners need to develop their skills in finding out about hospitality in the local area. Much of this can be investigative, including surveys of the area, visits to establishments and using the internet to explore websites. Other sources of information can include newspapers and magazines, local tourist information, libraries, trade and national press and publications, or professional associations such as People 1st – the Sector Skills Council for Hospitality. The information collected should build a picture of the local hospitality industry, including the range of industries that make it up, the services and products it offers and the range of job opportunities it can offer.

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Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important
At each level, the three bands indicate the differences in learner achievement. Assessors should use the information in the table to decide which mark band best describes a learner’s work, then, refer to the guidance to determine whether to place the mark at the top or bottom of the mark band. A compensatory system operates, where an item missing from one band can be compensated by work fulfilling the criteria for a higher band.

Band 3 The learner

Band 2 The learner

Band 1 The learner

Total

Learning Outcome 1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show some levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares some points showing the importance of some hospitality establishments to the local community. Describes points about some general job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes accurately the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of some hospitality establishments to some specific members of the local community. Describes some specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes in accurate detail the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of a range of hospitality establishments to a range of specific members of the local community. Describes in detail a range of specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

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0-4 marks

5-7 marks

8-10 marks

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Learning Outcome 2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show how tourism affects hospitality in the local area.

Describes some significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area.

Describes a range of significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area. Identifies a range of significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 8-10 marks Uses a range of sources of information appropriately to answer some questions independently. 10 10

Identifies some general factors which impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 0-4 marks

Identifies some significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 5-7 marks Uses some sources of information appropriately to answer some questions with limited support.

Learning Outcome 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Uses some sources of information to answer some questions with support.

0-4 marks Totals 12 9

5-7 marks 9

8-10 marks 30

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Guidance for Centres
Development Opportunities Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills EDI has embedded Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS) in specific assessment criteria within this unit. This is to ensure learners have the opportunity to develop these generic skills and competences within the context of learning experiences specifically related to the importance of the wider hospitality industry and the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs and events) that it comprises. The identification and application of specific PLTS within individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria also allow learners to plan and review their personal achievement and development. There are further opportunities for a range of PLTS to be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. The following sections highlight some of these additional opportunities for PLTS development and provide guidance for how these development opportunities can be implemented. Further information about PLTS and their application within the principal learning for the Diploma in Hospitality can be found in the guidance document.

Assessed PLTS
The following PLTS are assessed as part of the requirements of individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria and it is therefore necessary that they are delivered as part of the taught content.

Independent enquirers (IE2)
The outcome statement for this particular PLTS, as identified within AC3.1, requires young people to “plan and carry out research, appreciating the consequences of decisions”. In learning outcome 3, this is in relation to learners’ ability to use sources of information about hospitality. This particular assessment criterion assesses learners’ ability to research hospitality in the local area. Centres need to provide opportunities for learners to use an appropriate range of research methods and sources, for example to investigate the range of industries represented in the wider hospitality industry, or the range of job roles, including those that the learners themselves might wish to pursue.

Developed PLTS
There are a range of PLTS which can be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. Learners will have opportunities to develop their understanding of the importance of the wider hospitality industry during visits to local establishments and opportunities to talk to people who work in the industry. Therefore there are likely to be a wide range of opportunities to develop Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills. Some opportunities for PLTS development are highlighted below, although the examples listed do not form an exhaustive list.

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Independent enquirers (IE1, 4, 6)
This unit builds on Unit 1 and will frequently use a similar method of delivery (eg visits to industry). Centres can use these to help learners to develop their ability to identify questions to answer and problems to solve (IE1), for example asking questions of industry professionals as they research the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally (LO1, AC1.1). Centres can use this same assessment criterion to provide learners with opportunities to analyse and evaluate the information on revenue and employment they have found, judging its relevance and value (IE4). Learners will need to present their evidence and centres can help them to understand the importance of and build their ability to support their conclusions, using reasoned arguments and evidence (IE6).

Creative thinkers (CT1, 4, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to generate ideas and develop creative layouts (CT1) for presentations about their work, for example by preparing a display of their findings about job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry (LO1 AC1.3), or how tourism affects the wider hospitality industry in the local area (LO2 AC2.1). Centres can also encourage learners to ask questions to develop their thinking, particularly during visits to local establishments and presentations by local employers, for example on the importance of different establishments to the local community (LO1 AC1.2). Discussion groups following such visits or presentations are ideal vehicles for learners to develop the skills of questioning their own and others’ assumptions (CT4), particularly when working in new areas of knowledge and understanding such as comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.2). Learners will benefit from teachers’ feedback and may need to adapt their ideas about the industry (CT6) as their broader knowledge develops.

Reflective learners (RL2, 3, 5, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to set goals (RL2) with success criteria for their development and work. This can be achieved, for example, by setting a goal in relation to development of their knowledge of the effect of local tourism (LO2 AC2.1), such as a time frame for finding information or a format for presenting their findings. Using this same assessment criterion as an example, learners can benefit from reviewing their progress (RL3) through interim feedback from the teacher and acting on this to improve their knowledge and understanding of specific issues. This same approach (interim feedback) can also be used to develop the ability to evaluate their experiences and learning about the effect of local tourism in a way that informs their ongoing work (RL5). Presenting their findings to a group would use similar communications skills to those used during the feedback sessions, but learners can develop the ability to recognise their peers as a different audience and communicate their learning in a relevant way (RL6).

Team workers (TW1)
As with other units and areas of work, working in small groups can develop useful teamworking skills. Dividing learners into small groups each with a focus on a different 8

area of work – for example identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry, where different groups can focus on the range of hospitality industries – will help learners develop skills to collaborate with others and work towards common group goals (TW1).

Self managers (SM2, 3, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to work towards goals, showing initiative, commitment and perseverance (SM2), for example when comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.1), which for some learners could be a challenging task. Learners can take this forward, focusing on their ability to plan and manage their own activities (SM3), for example developing a plan that organises their time to help them research the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and presenting their findings to a group of other learners. Opportunities to develop their skills on responding positively to change, seeking advice and support when needed (SM6) can be geared to change in the industry itself, for example when considering factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2).

Effective participators (EP1, 5)
Centres can use this unit as an opportunity for learners to discuss issues of concern, seeking resolution where needed (EP1). This can be applied, for example, when identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2), where learners may need clarification and support on their findings. Centres can use the same opportunity to develop learners’ ability to influence others, negotiating and balancing diverse views to reach workable solutions (EP5). For example, they can consider the implications of a particular factor and how this may affect different stakeholders, as well as the hospitality industry.

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Functional Skills
Learners at this level must achieve ‘mastery’ in the functional skills of English, ICT and Maths at Level 1. ‘Mastery’ means that the learners are able to apply their skills in English, ICT and Maths at that level, in any situation related to living and working. Each functional skill has a separate, externally set and marked summative assessment. However, if learners are to acquire ‘mastery’ of the functional skills, it is preferable for them to be provided with integrated learning opportunities in which to demonstrate application of all 3 functional skills. In providing such opportunities, teachers will find it relatively easy to integrate English and some sections of ICT into projects, but integrating the functional skill of Maths will require more thought. However, prior to embarking on full projects, learners will need to practise demonstrating competence in applying functional skills during simple classroom exercises. Teachers should focus on the right hand column of the standards for the functional skills of Maths and English to ensure that learners achieve full coverage of the standards, ie ‘mastery’, and to ensure that they are prepared for the external summative assessment. With regard to ICT, however, the middle and right hand columns need to be covered.

Suggested activity
The activity below is an example of an activity which shows how functional skills can be developed through the delivery of this unit. There is no requirement for learners to complete the activity highlighted below and teachers may prefer to deliver the learning outcomes within this unit through other delivery strategies. However, teachers should refer to the following example as a specification for how functional skills can be addressed through delivery activities. Further information about how the unit may be delivered can be found in the delivery strategies section of this unit specification. Using the idea of mock interviews, learners should be invited to apply for a job in one of the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs; events), which they should agree with their teacher as part of the preparation for this activity. (The job role should be one that interests them and reflects their skills and attributes.)

Activity

Business –organization –in –a- global –context Assignment help

Managing communication assignment help
Learners are required to: Look at their personal outgoings and identify the level of salary they require. They should then research the type of organisation in which they would like a job.

Functional skills addressed

ICTU1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5; 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 4.2, ICTFS1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 M1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, 1.9, 1.12, 1.13, 1.15. 1.16

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Complete an application form for the job Prepare a CV A personal profile giving their reasons for wanting to join that organisation and listing their strengths/weaknesses etc Take part in mock interview

ICTD1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1. 3.1, 3.2, 4.2 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 EW1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5

ESL1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4

Legend
ICTU1.1= ICTFS1.1= ICTD1.1= M1.1= ESL1.1= ER1.1= EW 1.1= ICT 1.1 Use ICT systems ICT1.1 Find and select information ICT1.1 Develop, present and communicate information Maths 1.1 English speaking and listening 1.1 English reading 1.1 English writing 1.1

Please refer to the EDI Guidance for Centres, which gives tables showing the full list of learning outcomes for functional skills. The functional skills identified as being addressed are dependent upon the scope of the project as presented by the learner.

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Further Marking Advice
Glossary of Terms
Accurate The learner uses a description of revenue and employment which is factual and reflects a precise and exact picture or reflection of the situation.

Appropriate

The learner uses sources which will provide the information needed .

Compares

The learner examines and notes similarities or differences.

Describes in detail

The learner gives an account or representation of the levels of revenue and employment in words covering most key or significant points or issues in a coherent and organised way.

General

The learner makes correct points that relate to the factors impacting on the hospitality industry; however there will be little application to the actual situation presented.

Significant

Important in effect or meaning.

Specific

The learner refers to points that are in real existence, for example the job role will be a real one in a local establishment.

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Mark Scheme Exemplification
Mark Band
Mark Band 3 – Learners up to Pass level, meeting assessment criteria at lowest level.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 3 with some evidence missing, but compensated by some present in higher mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have only partly completed the evidence required or their work falls short of the required standard for the level. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 3, the learner needs only to describe points (this must be more than just a list), which may not be cohesive. The points are unlikely to be well organised, but should have some relevance to the importance of the hospitality industry. Some points are likely to be weak. Learners need to make some points about the importance of some establishments to the local community. Again, points may not be well organised, may be weak or have limited relevance. The establishments considered may be limited in number or type and will probably be limited to those the learner has visited or studied in case study materials. Learners must make some attempt at comparison, for example by commenting on the value to the community. Learners will have described a small number of job roles, but this will be in general terms, rather than referring to the work of real people in the industry. Learners need evidence that reflects their knowledge of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some simple points about how tourism affects the industry, such as the proximity of a local airport or a nearby Tourist Information Centre, but these may lack relevance. They need to identify factors affecting the local and UK industry in similar ways, for example agricultural problems such as foot and mouth. These again may lack relevance (eg little direct effect on a citycentre hotel). Learners will use some sources of information but they may interpret the information incorrectly or at a very superficial level when answering related questions. They will need direction from a teacher to complete the task.

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Mark Band
Mark Band 2 – Learners displaying understanding/skills beyond minimum required by assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 2 with some missing evidence compensated by evidence in a higher mark band. At the bottom of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have all the evidence required for mark band 3 but with one element of evidence for mark band 2. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 2, descriptions need to be accurate, for example reflecting a clear picture of the proportion of hospitality revenue against GDP, or the numbers employed in a particular job role. The comparison should reflect the similarities and differences of two or three hospitality establishments and why or how they are important to specific the local community. These may be one or two examples, such as providing discounted menus for a local pensioners group or sponsoring a local football team’s kit. Learners will have described a range of job roles and some of the roles described will demonstrate the work of real people in the industry. However, this standard will not be consistent and some of the job roles will only be described in general terms. Learners need evidence that reflects their understanding of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, such as the provision of accommodation, food and beverage services for tourists visiting a local attraction. They need to identify some factors affecting the local and UK industry that are significant, having a clear importance or relevance to the local area, such as a new factory opening that would need catering services. Learners will use a range of sources of information to answer questions, at times the information will be used appropriately but this standard will not be consistent. Learners will seek support from a teacher to carry out routine elements of the work.

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Mark Band
Mark Band 1 – Learners displaying understanding/skills at the highest level specified by the assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top of mark band 1, learners will have produced evidence to fulfil all of the requirements for the mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 1 it is likely that the learner will have produced all the evidence required for mark band 2 but with one element of evidence into mark band 1. Missing work in mark band 2 could be compensated by two elements in mark band 1. Learners need to provide a well-organised and detailed description of levels of employment and revenue at local and national level that is accurate and factually correct (guidance on structuring their evidence should ensure they are clear about this). The level of detail can be achieved by presenting evidence at industry level supported by evidence from their research (for example charts showing national employment distributions in different hospitality industries), then drawing information together into an overview. The comparison reflecting similarities and differences should cover a range of establishments from different hospitality industries, showing clearly why or how they are important to a range of specific members of the local community. This will be best achieved where the range of community members shows contrast. Large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will describe a range of job roles in terms of the work of real people in the industry in their local area. This standard will, unlike mark band 2 be fairly consistent and the description will include accurate detail. Learners need to describe significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, which should show clearly the relationship between the two industries, for example the provision of accommodation and parking packages to support tourists using a nearby airport. Similarly, they need to identify a range of factors affecting the local and UK industry, such as the growth of farmhouse accommodation provision as a result of declining agriculture. In both instances, large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will use a range of different sources effectively to answer questions. Support of a teacher will be sought to deal with challenging but not routine situations.

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Control
This unit is subject to MEDIUM level control. Specified tasks should be completed under the supervision and control of the teacher. Further guidance about controls for the assessment of this unit can be found in the Internal Assessment Specification. EDI have also produced Sample Assessment Material to further specify the requirements for centres.

Guided Learning Hours
Within this unit GLH refers both to time for teaching and learning and time for assessment activities. For this unit 25 hours must be dedicated to teaching and learning activities and 5 must be used for assessment activities. Assessment is likely to be through a project or assignment requiring straightforward delivery of knowledge and understanding.

Employer Engagement
Experiencing the world of work is critically important for learners. It provides opportunities for learners to demonstrate that they are familiar with the hospitality industry and for this to be duly recognised through either practical performance or learning in a work-based hospitality environment as part of a work placement. Centres and individual teachers need to develop good relationships with the employers who have shown their willingness to contribute to delivery by supporting the Diploma Gateway process. Industry mentors can also add valuable input and support individual learners. Building solid relationships with the local hospitality industry is extremely important for this unit and an employer could be used to introduce learners to both the industry and the unit (this could be done in conjunction with Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works). Other opportunities for work-related learning can be maximised by arranging day or half-day trips to a range of establishments in different hospitality industries. This could involve a tour of the establishment with a manager, or by experiencing the establishment’s services as a customer. Such visits will add greatly to realism and vocational relevance. Learners can be provided with targeted websites from a wide range of organisations and establishments (large and small, privately and publicly owned) to investigate, either in general or focused on a specific issue. There are excellent opportunities to explore learners’ potential career development. Employers can also support teachers and the development of materials by providing real or simulated data relating to revenue, information about staff employment opportunities and turnover, information about any links they already have with the local community, copies of job descriptions or recent advertisements, examples of where they engage with the local tourism industry, and case study materials on factors that have impacted on their operation (either locally or nationally, if the establishment is part of a larger national chain). Employers can also contribute to classroom input where this is appropriate, such as by giving an introduction to the unit, or leading a discussion on learners’ findings. Employers are crucial to the assessment process. They can help to build assessment materials, commenting on their realism and relevance to the hospitality industry. Employers can also contribute to formative and summative assessment, for example by reviewing the evidence that learners have produced on the importance of the hospitality industry to the local economy or community, or by attending presentations by learners on the factors which impact on the hospitality industry and asking pertinent questions. 16

Delivery Strategies
This unit should relate to and complement the delivery of Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works, as well as contributing to development in other units. Its aim is to develop learners’ understanding of the importance of the hospitality industry, including levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally, the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also develop their knowledge of the factors which impact on the hospitality industry, including the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area and the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry. Other local examples might be the development of new housing provision, requiring additional hospitality support through pubs, restaurants, cafes and hotels, school meals and industrial canteens. Such a development would draw new people to the area, providing a wider group of potential customers. Similarly, the development or expansion of a local airport may increase the demand for hotel accommodation from travellers transiting in the local area. Learners should be encouraged to research the local area themselves and consider a range of local and national factors that will affect the industry they are studying. Visits to relevant hospitality establishments, setting practical and investigative tasks, and inviting visiting speakers to the centre can focus jointly on this unit and Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works. Such activities will underpin learners’ understanding of how hospitality contributes to the economy (1 in 5 of the new jobs created in the UK is in hospitality), how it can offer job opportunities and how it relates to the tourism industry. A short presentation to hospitality employers to show understanding of the industry would be an appropriate piece of formative and/or summative assessment. Witness statements would further testify to learners’ knowledge and understanding of the industry. This unit could be delivered as part of or as the complete extended project. The learner’s work experience could also be used as a vehicle for delivering the unit. Guidance materials need to be made available for learners so that they can continue to make appropriate career choices. Examples of how the unit could be delivered include: Visits to a selection of different hospitality businesses on a local basis to support learners’ understanding of the importance of hospitality establishments to the local community, for example: A local farm offering bed and breakfast accommodation (this could be combined with a talk on sourcing local produce) A small café or coffee shop operation (often dependent on visitors to the area for passing trade) A local stately home or other tourist attraction (providing opportunities to consider the hospitality industry’s relationship with tourism) A local sports club venue Discussions with invited speakers from local hospitality businesses to add vocational realism to issues such as levels of revenue and employment

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Presentations from representatives of local organisations such as the Federation of Small Businesses or the Chamber of Commerce to underpin the importance of the hospitality industry to the local community Presentations by visiting tourism speakers to help hospitality learners relate to the tourism industry Group discussions of what experience learners have of the hospitality and tourism industries and how they relate to each other (this may be limited) Case studies that illustrate specific issues relating to the importance of the hospitality industry and the factors that can affect it Simple tests to underpin learning Active learning techniques that will promote understanding for various learning styles include: A chart showing the range of hospitality establishments in an area to illustrate how the industry contributes to local and national revenue and employment A log or diary of visits to hospitality establishments indicating how knowledge can contribute to evidence Research activities, for example to explore how the hospitality industry contributes to local and national revenue Using up-to-date resources to find out about the hospitality industry, such as trade journals, industry-focused websites and, in relation to the local industry, local newspapers/reports and People 1st (the Sector Skills Council for hospitality) Investigating local job opportunities in the hospitality industry and presenting them in a chart format to illustrate the range of job roles and hospitality establishments represented A personal statement of their experience of hospitality and/or tourism (either through visits or personal experience) Role-plays to explore different hospitality scenarios



The level of support required by a learner or the independence they can demonstrate will vary, differentiating learners from the least and most able.

Integrating units
For this unit to integrate with others, centre teams need to consider the structure of their programme and how integration of units can be most effective. This unit builds on Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works and will help learners to understand the importance of the hospitality industry, how it relates to the tourism industry and the range of factors that affect it. It will also integrate in limited ways with most other units in the Foundation Hospitality Diploma. Learners can develop skills and understanding and/or generate assessment evidence toward the following units:

Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works
This unit is externally assessed, which will impact on how learners develop their knowledge and understanding of the hospitality industry. Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important will broaden this knowledge and understanding and improve learners’ confidence when tackling the external assessment. 18

This unit will also support development of evidence for Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, particularly for learning outcome 1. Learners will be able to use their knowledge of the hospitality services provided by different job roles to identify those roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also be able to use their knowledge of hospitality services and the categories of establishments, providing them when they are developing their evidence for local issues and how these determine the importance of hospitality establishments to a local community. Learners can use their knowledge from this unit to build their knowledge of the factors affecting the UK hospitality industry and how it can be affected by tourism.

Unit 3: Introducing customer service in hospitality
Whilst not directly related to Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, this unit will help to provide a platform of knowledge that will help learners develop their evidence relating to the importance of the hospitality industry.

Unit 4: Developing skills for the hospitality industry
Learners will be able to use evidence from this unit focusing on teamworking and their understanding of different roles in the hospitality industry to help them identify job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. In reverse, learners’ knowledge of the importance of the hospitality industry gained through Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important can underpin the development of learners’ abilities as effective team members.

Unit 5: Introducing responsible food preparation
Links with this unit are more tenuous. It is possible for learners to make connections between the local economy and local issues (such as sourcing local foods and the overall impact on the environment) but this may stretch the capacity of Level 1 learners.

Unit 6: Introducing skills for preparing and serving food and beverages Again, there is no direct link with this unit. However, learners may be able to appreciate how providing good food and beverage services can contribute to the local economy, providing a relationship with learning outcome 1 of Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important.

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Resources
Textbooks
Jones P: An Introduction to Hospitality, 2nd Edition (Thompson Learning 2002) ISBN: 0826460771 Holloway J: The Business of Tourism, 7th Edition (Financial Times/Prentice Hall 2006) ISBN: 0273701614 Gardiner J, Housley J: GCSE Hospitality and Catering: The Essentials (Hodder Arnold 2007) ISBN: 0340948396

Journals
Learners may also benefit from articles in the Caterer and Hotelkeeper – available from high street newsagents. Hospitality magazine is the professional publication for industry managers’ established or aspiring. Published by the newly-branded Institute of Hospitality, with a passionate take on all things influencing and driving change in hospitality, each quarter Hospitality reports on key issues affecting hotels and restaurants, contract caterers and SMEs.

Websites
www.bha.org.uk British Hospitality Association – the national trade association for hotels, restaurants and caterers British Institute of Innkeeping – the professional body for the licensed retail industry The industry’s leading hospitality job site, with a wide range of jobs advertised Caterer and Hotelkeeper industry journal Institute of Hospitality – the professional body for managers and aspiring managers working in the hospitality, leisure and tourism industries; aims to promote the highest professional standards of management and education in the international hospitality, leisure and tourism industries People 1st – The Sector Skills Council for the Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism industries; site contains research into key facts and figures and industry issues Schools Hospitality Project – introduces 11-18 year-olds to the UK’s hospitality industry and helps them learn about career paths within the industry; also introduces young people to the skills and attitudes employers look for.

www.bii.org

www.caterer.com

www.caterersearch.com www.instituteofhospitality.org/

www.people1st.co.uk

www.schoolsproject.co.uk

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www.springboarduk.org.uk

Springboard UK – industry-supported organisation which promotes careers in the industry and supports learning through the provision of learning materials for teachers British Tourist Authority – site contains considerable volume of information regarding industry data Visit Britain – the national tourism agency, promotes Britain internationally; aims to build the value of tourism to Britain and in England, generating wealth and jobs across Britain; site contains information regarding tourism destinations, travel and accommodation targeted at overseas visitors
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Level 1 Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important Guided Learning Hours: 30 (25 for teaching and learning activities, 5 for assessment activities)

Unit aims
The wider hospitality industry and the seven industries within it, provide a stimulating and challenging world for you to study and work in. Through this unit, you will learn how the everyday lives of people are affected by the important contribution the hospitality industry makes to the UK economy and the local community you live in. You will discover how the world of tourism can affect the hospitality industry, as well as the impact that factors such as major events or natural disasters can have. This unit will include plenty of opportunities for you to visit real hospitality establishments and businesses to build your knowledge and understanding of the industry. During these visits and other learning opportunities, you will also have an opportunity to talk to industry specialists about the hospitality industry and the jobs they do within it.

Assessment Method
This unit is internally assessed.
The assessment for this unit involves planning and reviewing activities to demonstrate the learner’s knowledge and skills. Learners will be expected to take responsibility for their own role and adapt behaviour accordingly. For further information about the requirements for this unit, including controls teachers must refer to the ‘Internal Assessment Specification’. EDI have produced sample assessment material to further specify the requirements for centres.

1

Learning Outcome

Learners will:

1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 1.1 Describe the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally. 1.2 Compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community. 1.3 Describe job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry

Learners need to develop understanding of the levels of revenue and employment generated by the hospitality industry on a local and national basis. This will include recognition that the level of employment opportunities reflects the growth of the hospitality industry. Furthermore, they develop their knowledge of how income from these jobs contributes to the economy by feeding back into businesses, for example: by providing jobs (front of house, such as; waiters, bar staff, event managers, receptionists and cruise line pursers and back of house, such as; chefs, maintenance, finance, marketing, human resources) by bringing visitors to the area (eg a local hotel targeting the business and conference market or a major sporting event bringing supporters from other areas) This should build on learners’ knowledge of the wider hospitality industry developed in unit 1, including the range of hospitality industries and the businesses within them. As well as contributing to the local economy, the hospitality industry is important to communities in various ways. Learners need to be able to compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community considering, for example, the importance of: providing venues for local people and visitors in the area to meet sourcing food and beverages through local providers supporting issues of local importance, such as developing tourism packages to support a local wildlife or hiking centre, sponsoring local clubs and societies supporting local schools by giving talks about hospitality and how it contributes to the local economy and community Learners need to explore and develop their understanding of real job roles that are undertaken in the local community across the range of hospitality industries. Additionally they should develop understanding of the earnings and rewards that the industry can offer including career progression and the chance to travel, both nationally and internationally.

2

Learning outcome

Learners will:

2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 2.1 Describe the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area. 2.2 Identify the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry.

Learners need to develop understanding of how the local hospitality industry can be affected by the tourism industry and its component parts including: visitor attractions – eg cultural and heritage sites, museums and galleries, theme parks, national parks, sporting venues, gardens, wildlife parks and zoos entertainment – eg sporting events, concerts, theatres, outdoor festivals facilities – eg transport (air/coach/train/taxi operators and associated terminals), Tourist Information Centres, travel agents and tour operators Learners should develop knowledge of how other factors affect both the local and national hospitality industry, for example: natural disasters – foreign tourists are reluctant to visit those areas affected transport links interrupted – flights delayed by poor weather causes guests to arrive late increase in demand for hotel rooms when major events are held locally the threat of terrorism in different countries and locations

A range of examples are included in this unit, however, this is not an exhaustive list and centres can use additional examples where appropriate.

3

Learning Outcome Learners will: 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 3.1 Use sources of information to answer questions.

Learners need to develop their skills in finding out about hospitality in the local area. Much of this can be investigative, including surveys of the area, visits to establishments and using the internet to explore websites. Other sources of information can include newspapers and magazines, local tourist information, libraries, trade and national press and publications, or professional associations such as People 1st – the Sector Skills Council for Hospitality. The information collected should build a picture of the local hospitality industry, including the range of industries that make it up, the services and products it offers and the range of job opportunities it can offer.

Theories and concept of human development and behavior

Applying promotional techniques

4

Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important
At each level, the three bands indicate the differences in learner achievement. Assessors should use the information in the table to decide which mark band best describes a learner’s work, then, refer to the guidance to determine whether to place the mark at the top or bottom of the mark band. A compensatory system operates, where an item missing from one band can be compensated by work fulfilling the criteria for a higher band.

Band 3 The learner

Band 2 The learner

Band 1 The learner

Total

Learning Outcome 1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show some levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares some points showing the importance of some hospitality establishments to the local community. Describes points about some general job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes accurately the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of some hospitality establishments to some specific members of the local community. Describes some specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes in accurate detail the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of a range of hospitality establishments to a range of specific members of the local community. Describes in detail a range of specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

10

0-4 marks

5-7 marks

8-10 marks

5

Learning Outcome 2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show how tourism affects hospitality in the local area.

Describes some significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area.

Describes a range of significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area. Identifies a range of significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 8-10 marks Uses a range of sources of information appropriately to answer some questions independently. 10 10

Identifies some general factors which impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 0-4 marks

Identifies some significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 5-7 marks Uses some sources of information appropriately to answer some questions with limited support.

Learning Outcome 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Uses some sources of information to answer some questions with support.

0-4 marks Totals 12 9

5-7 marks 9

8-10 marks 30

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Guidance for Centres
Development Opportunities Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills EDI has embedded Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS) in specific assessment criteria within this unit. This is to ensure learners have the opportunity to develop these generic skills and competences within the context of learning experiences specifically related to the importance of the wider hospitality industry and the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs and events) that it comprises. The identification and application of specific PLTS within individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria also allow learners to plan and review their personal achievement and development. There are further opportunities for a range of PLTS to be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. The following sections highlight some of these additional opportunities for PLTS development and provide guidance for how these development opportunities can be implemented. Further information about PLTS and their application within the principal learning for the Diploma in Hospitality can be found in the guidance document.

Assessed PLTS
The following PLTS are assessed as part of the requirements of individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria and it is therefore necessary that they are delivered as part of the taught content.

Independent enquirers (IE2)
The outcome statement for this particular PLTS, as identified within AC3.1, requires young people to “plan and carry out research, appreciating the consequences of decisions”. In learning outcome 3, this is in relation to learners’ ability to use sources of information about hospitality. This particular assessment criterion assesses learners’ ability to research hospitality in the local area. Centres need to provide opportunities for learners to use an appropriate range of research methods and sources, for example to investigate the range of industries represented in the wider hospitality industry, or the range of job roles, including those that the learners themselves might wish to pursue.

Developed PLTS
There are a range of PLTS which can be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. Learners will have opportunities to develop their understanding of the importance of the wider hospitality industry during visits to local establishments and opportunities to talk to people who work in the industry. Therefore there are likely to be a wide range of opportunities to develop Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills. Some opportunities for PLTS development are highlighted below, although the examples listed do not form an exhaustive list.

7

Independent enquirers (IE1, 4, 6)
This unit builds on Unit 1 and will frequently use a similar method of delivery (eg visits to industry). Centres can use these to help learners to develop their ability to identify questions to answer and problems to solve (IE1), for example asking questions of industry professionals as they research the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally (LO1, AC1.1). Centres can use this same assessment criterion to provide learners with opportunities to analyse and evaluate the information on revenue and employment they have found, judging its relevance and value (IE4). Learners will need to present their evidence and centres can help them to understand the importance of and build their ability to support their conclusions, using reasoned arguments and evidence (IE6).

Creative thinkers (CT1, 4, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to generate ideas and develop creative layouts (CT1) for presentations about their work, for example by preparing a display of their findings about job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry (LO1 AC1.3), or how tourism affects the wider hospitality industry in the local area (LO2 AC2.1). Centres can also encourage learners to ask questions to develop their thinking, particularly during visits to local establishments and presentations by local employers, for example on the importance of different establishments to the local community (LO1 AC1.2). Discussion groups following such visits or presentations are ideal vehicles for learners to develop the skills of questioning their own and others’ assumptions (CT4), particularly when working in new areas of knowledge and understanding such as comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.2). Learners will benefit from teachers’ feedback and may need to adapt their ideas about the industry (CT6) as their broader knowledge develops.

Reflective learners (RL2, 3, 5, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to set goals (RL2) with success criteria for their development and work. This can be achieved, for example, by setting a goal in relation to development of their knowledge of the effect of local tourism (LO2 AC2.1), such as a time frame for finding information or a format for presenting their findings. Using this same assessment criterion as an example, learners can benefit from reviewing their progress (RL3) through interim feedback from the teacher and acting on this to improve their knowledge and understanding of specific issues. This same approach (interim feedback) can also be used to develop the ability to evaluate their experiences and learning about the effect of local tourism in a way that informs their ongoing work (RL5). Presenting their findings to a group would use similar communications skills to those used during the feedback sessions, but learners can develop the ability to recognise their peers as a different audience and communicate their learning in a relevant way (RL6).

Team workers (TW1)
As with other units and areas of work, working in small groups can develop useful teamworking skills. Dividing learners into small groups each with a focus on a different 8

area of work – for example identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry, where different groups can focus on the range of hospitality industries – will help learners develop skills to collaborate with others and work towards common group goals (TW1).

Self managers (SM2, 3, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to work towards goals, showing initiative, commitment and perseverance (SM2), for example when comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.1), which for some learners could be a challenging task. Learners can take this forward, focusing on their ability to plan and manage their own activities (SM3), for example developing a plan that organises their time to help them research the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and presenting their findings to a group of other learners. Opportunities to develop their skills on responding positively to change, seeking advice and support when needed (SM6) can be geared to change in the industry itself, for example when considering factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2).

Effective participators (EP1, 5)
Centres can use this unit as an opportunity for learners to discuss issues of concern, seeking resolution where needed (EP1). This can be applied, for example, when identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2), where learners may need clarification and support on their findings. Centres can use the same opportunity to develop learners’ ability to influence others, negotiating and balancing diverse views to reach workable solutions (EP5). For example, they can consider the implications of a particular factor and how this may affect different stakeholders, as well as the hospitality industry.

9

Functional Skills
Learners at this level must achieve ‘mastery’ in the functional skills of English, ICT and Maths at Level 1. ‘Mastery’ means that the learners are able to apply their skills in English, ICT and Maths at that level, in any situation related to living and working. Each functional skill has a separate, externally set and marked summative assessment. However, if learners are to acquire ‘mastery’ of the functional skills, it is preferable for them to be provided with integrated learning opportunities in which to demonstrate application of all 3 functional skills. In providing such opportunities, teachers will find it relatively easy to integrate English and some sections of ICT into projects, but integrating the functional skill of Maths will require more thought. However, prior to embarking on full projects, learners will need to practise demonstrating competence in applying functional skills during simple classroom exercises. Teachers should focus on the right hand column of the standards for the functional skills of Maths and English to ensure that learners achieve full coverage of the standards, ie ‘mastery’, and to ensure that they are prepared for the external summative assessment. With regard to ICT, however, the middle and right hand columns need to be covered.

Suggested activity
The activity below is an example of an activity which shows how functional skills can be developed through the delivery of this unit. There is no requirement for learners to complete the activity highlighted below and teachers may prefer to deliver the learning outcomes within this unit through other delivery strategies. However, teachers should refer to the following example as a specification for how functional skills can be addressed through delivery activities. Further information about how the unit may be delivered can be found in the delivery strategies section of this unit specification. Using the idea of mock interviews, learners should be invited to apply for a job in one of the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs; events), which they should agree with their teacher as part of the preparation for this activity. (The job role should be one that interests them and reflects their skills and attributes.)

Activity
Learners are required to: Look at their personal outgoings and identify the level of salary they require. They should then research the type of organisation in which they would like a job.

Functional skills addressed

ICTU1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5; 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 4.2, ICTFS1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 M1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, 1.9, 1.12, 1.13, 1.15. 1.16

10

Complete an application form for the job Prepare a CV A personal profile giving their reasons for wanting to join that organisation and listing their strengths/weaknesses etc Take part in mock interview

ICTD1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1. 3.1, 3.2, 4.2 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 EW1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5

ESL1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4

Legend
ICTU1.1= ICTFS1.1= ICTD1.1= M1.1= ESL1.1= ER1.1= EW 1.1= ICT 1.1 Use ICT systems ICT1.1 Find and select information ICT1.1 Develop, present and communicate information Maths 1.1 English speaking and listening 1.1 English reading 1.1 English writing 1.1

Please refer to the EDI Guidance for Centres, which gives tables showing the full list of learning outcomes for functional skills. The functional skills identified as being addressed are dependent upon the scope of the project as presented by the learner.

11

Further Marking Advice
Glossary of Terms
Accurate The learner uses a description of revenue and employment which is factual and reflects a precise and exact picture or reflection of the situation.

Appropriate

The learner uses sources which will provide the information needed .

Compares

The learner examines and notes similarities or differences.

Describes in detail

The learner gives an account or representation of the levels of revenue and employment in words covering most key or significant points or issues in a coherent and organised way.

General

The learner makes correct points that relate to the factors impacting on the hospitality industry; however there will be little application to the actual situation presented.

Significant

Important in effect or meaning.

Specific

The learner refers to points that are in real existence, for example the job role will be a real one in a local establishment.

12

Mark Scheme Exemplification
Mark Band
Mark Band 3 – Learners up to Pass level, meeting assessment criteria at lowest level.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 3 with some evidence missing, but compensated by some present in higher mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have only partly completed the evidence required or their work falls short of the required standard for the level. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 3, the learner needs only to describe points (this must be more than just a list), which may not be cohesive. The points are unlikely to be well organised, but should have some relevance to the importance of the hospitality industry. Some points are likely to be weak. Learners need to make some points about the importance of some establishments to the local community. Again, points may not be well organised, may be weak or have limited relevance. The establishments considered may be limited in number or type and will probably be limited to those the learner has visited or studied in case study materials. Learners must make some attempt at comparison, for example by commenting on the value to the community. Learners will have described a small number of job roles, but this will be in general terms, rather than referring to the work of real people in the industry. Learners need evidence that reflects their knowledge of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some simple points about how tourism affects the industry, such as the proximity of a local airport or a nearby Tourist Information Centre, but these may lack relevance. They need to identify factors affecting the local and UK industry in similar ways, for example agricultural problems such as foot and mouth. These again may lack relevance (eg little direct effect on a citycentre hotel). Learners will use some sources of information but they may interpret the information incorrectly or at a very superficial level when answering related questions. They will need direction from a teacher to complete the task.

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Mark Band
Mark Band 2 – Learners displaying understanding/skills beyond minimum required by assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 2 with some missing evidence compensated by evidence in a higher mark band. At the bottom of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have all the evidence required for mark band 3 but with one element of evidence for mark band 2. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 2, descriptions need to be accurate, for example reflecting a clear picture of the proportion of hospitality revenue against GDP, or the numbers employed in a particular job role. The comparison should reflect the similarities and differences of two or three hospitality establishments and why or how they are important to specific the local community. These may be one or two examples, such as providing discounted menus for a local pensioners group or sponsoring a local football team’s kit. Learners will have described a range of job roles and some of the roles described will demonstrate the work of real people in the industry. However, this standard will not be consistent and some of the job roles will only be described in general terms. Learners need evidence that reflects their understanding of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, such as the provision of accommodation, food and beverage services for tourists visiting a local attraction. They need to identify some factors affecting the local and UK industry that are significant, having a clear importance or relevance to the local area, such as a new factory opening that would need catering services. Learners will use a range of sources of information to answer questions, at times the information will be used appropriately but this standard will not be consistent. Learners will seek support from a teacher to carry out routine elements of the work.

14

Mark Band
Mark Band 1 – Learners displaying understanding/skills at the highest level specified by the assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top of mark band 1, learners will have produced evidence to fulfil all of the requirements for the mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 1 it is likely that the learner will have produced all the evidence required for mark band 2 but with one element of evidence into mark band 1. Missing work in mark band 2 could be compensated by two elements in mark band 1. Learners need to provide a well-organised and detailed description of levels of employment and revenue at local and national level that is accurate and factually correct (guidance on structuring their evidence should ensure they are clear about this). The level of detail can be achieved by presenting evidence at industry level supported by evidence from their research (for example charts showing national employment distributions in different hospitality industries), then drawing information together into an overview. The comparison reflecting similarities and differences should cover a range of establishments from different hospitality industries, showing clearly why or how they are important to a range of specific members of the local community. This will be best achieved where the range of community members shows contrast. Large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will describe a range of job roles in terms of the work of real people in the industry in their local area. This standard will, unlike mark band 2 be fairly consistent and the description will include accurate detail. Learners need to describe significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, which should show clearly the relationship between the two industries, for example the provision of accommodation and parking packages to support tourists using a nearby airport. Similarly, they need to identify a range of factors affecting the local and UK industry, such as the growth of farmhouse accommodation provision as a result of declining agriculture. In both instances, large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will use a range of different sources effectively to answer questions. Support of a teacher will be sought to deal with challenging but not routine situations.

15

Control
This unit is subject to MEDIUM level control. Specified tasks should be completed under the supervision and control of the teacher. Further guidance about controls for the assessment of this unit can be found in the Internal Assessment Specification. EDI have also produced Sample Assessment Material to further specify the requirements for centres.

Guided Learning Hours
Within this unit GLH refers both to time for teaching and learning and time for assessment activities. For this unit 25 hours must be dedicated to teaching and learning activities and 5 must be used for assessment activities. Assessment is likely to be through a project or assignment requiring straightforward delivery of knowledge and understanding.

Employer Engagement
Experiencing the world of work is critically important for learners. It provides opportunities for learners to demonstrate that they are familiar with the hospitality industry and for this to be duly recognised through either practical performance or learning in a work-based hospitality environment as part of a work placement. Centres and individual teachers need to develop good relationships with the employers who have shown their willingness to contribute to delivery by supporting the Diploma Gateway process. Industry mentors can also add valuable input and support individual learners. Building solid relationships with the local hospitality industry is extremely important for this unit and an employer could be used to introduce learners to both the industry and the unit (this could be done in conjunction with Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works). Other opportunities for work-related learning can be maximised by arranging day or half-day trips to a range of establishments in different hospitality industries. This could involve a tour of the establishment with a manager, or by experiencing the establishment’s services as a customer. Such visits will add greatly to realism and vocational relevance. Learners can be provided with targeted websites from a wide range of organisations and establishments (large and small, privately and publicly owned) to investigate, either in general or focused on a specific issue. There are excellent opportunities to explore learners’ potential career development. Employers can also support teachers and the development of materials by providing real or simulated data relating to revenue, information about staff employment opportunities and turnover, information about any links they already have with the local community, copies of job descriptions or recent advertisements, examples of where they engage with the local tourism industry, and case study materials on factors that have impacted on their operation (either locally or nationally, if the establishment is part of a larger national chain). Employers can also contribute to classroom input where this is appropriate, such as by giving an introduction to the unit, or leading a discussion on learners’ findings. Employers are crucial to the assessment process. They can help to build assessment materials, commenting on their realism and relevance to the hospitality industry. Employers can also contribute to formative and summative assessment, for example by reviewing the evidence that learners have produced on the importance of the hospitality industry to the local economy or community, or by attending presentations by learners on the factors which impact on the hospitality industry and asking pertinent questions. 16

Delivery Strategies
This unit should relate to and complement the delivery of Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works, as well as contributing to development in other units. Its aim is to develop learners’ understanding of the importance of the hospitality industry, including levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally, the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also develop their knowledge of the factors which impact on the hospitality industry, including the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area and the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry. Other local examples might be the development of new housing provision, requiring additional hospitality support through pubs, restaurants, cafes and hotels, school meals and industrial canteens. Such a development would draw new people to the area, providing a wider group of potential customers. Similarly, the development or expansion of a local airport may increase the demand for hotel accommodation from travellers transiting in the local area. Learners should be encouraged to research the local area themselves and consider a range of local and national factors that will affect the industry they are studying. Visits to relevant hospitality establishments, setting practical and investigative tasks, and inviting visiting speakers to the centre can focus jointly on this unit and Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works. Such activities will underpin learners’ understanding of how hospitality contributes to the economy (1 in 5 of the new jobs created in the UK is in hospitality), how it can offer job opportunities and how it relates to the tourism industry. A short presentation to hospitality employers to show understanding of the industry would be an appropriate piece of formative and/or summative assessment. Witness statements would further testify to learners’ knowledge and understanding of the industry. This unit could be delivered as part of or as the complete extended project. The learner’s work experience could also be used as a vehicle for delivering the unit. Guidance materials need to be made available for learners so that they can continue to make appropriate career choices. Examples of how the unit could be delivered include: Visits to a selection of different hospitality businesses on a local basis to support learners’ understanding of the importance of hospitality establishments to the local community, for example: A local farm offering bed and breakfast accommodation (this could be combined with a talk on sourcing local produce) A small café or coffee shop operation (often dependent on visitors to the area for passing trade) A local stately home or other tourist attraction (providing opportunities to consider the hospitality industry’s relationship with tourism) A local sports club venue Discussions with invited speakers from local hospitality businesses to add vocational realism to issues such as levels of revenue and employment

17

Presentations from representatives of local organisations such as the Federation of Small Businesses or the Chamber of Commerce to underpin the importance of the hospitality industry to the local community Presentations by visiting tourism speakers to help hospitality learners relate to the tourism industry Group discussions of what experience learners have of the hospitality and tourism industries and how they relate to each other (this may be limited) Case studies that illustrate specific issues relating to the importance of the hospitality industry and the factors that can affect it Simple tests to underpin learning Active learning techniques that will promote understanding for various learning styles include: A chart showing the range of hospitality establishments in an area to illustrate how the industry contributes to local and national revenue and employment A log or diary of visits to hospitality establishments indicating how knowledge can contribute to evidence Research activities, for example to explore how the hospitality industry contributes to local and national revenue Using up-to-date resources to find out about the hospitality industry, such as trade journals, industry-focused websites and, in relation to the local industry, local newspapers/reports and People 1st (the Sector Skills Council for hospitality) Investigating local job opportunities in the hospitality industry and presenting them in a chart format to illustrate the range of job roles and hospitality establishments represented A personal statement of their experience of hospitality and/or tourism (either through visits or personal experience) Role-plays to explore different hospitality scenarios



The level of support required by a learner or the independence they can demonstrate will vary, differentiating learners from the least and most able.

Integrating units
For this unit to integrate with others, centre teams need to consider the structure of their programme and how integration of units can be most effective. This unit builds on Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works and will help learners to understand the importance of the hospitality industry, how it relates to the tourism industry and the range of factors that affect it. It will also integrate in limited ways with most other units in the Foundation Hospitality Diploma. Learners can develop skills and understanding and/or generate assessment evidence toward the following units:

Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works
This unit is externally assessed, which will impact on how learners develop their knowledge and understanding of the hospitality industry. Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important will broaden this knowledge and understanding and improve learners’ confidence when tackling the external assessment. 18

This unit will also support development of evidence for Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, particularly for learning outcome 1. Learners will be able to use their knowledge of the hospitality services provided by different job roles to identify those roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also be able to use their knowledge of hospitality services and the categories of establishments, providing them when they are developing their evidence for local issues and how these determine the importance of hospitality establishments to a local community. Learners can use their knowledge from this unit to build their knowledge of the factors affecting the UK hospitality industry and how it can be affected by tourism.

Unit 3: Introducing customer service in hospitality
Whilst not directly related to Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, this unit will help to provide a platform of knowledge that will help learners develop their evidence relating to the importance of the hospitality industry.

Unit 4: Developing skills for the hospitality industry
Learners will be able to use evidence from this unit focusing on teamworking and their understanding of different roles in the hospitality industry to help them identify job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. In reverse, learners’ knowledge of the importance of the hospitality industry gained through Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important can underpin the development of learners’ abilities as effective team members.

Unit 5: Introducing responsible food preparation
Links with this unit are more tenuous. It is possible for learners to make connections between the local economy and local issues (such as sourcing local foods and the overall impact on the environment) but this may stretch the capacity of Level 1 learners.

Unit 6: Introducing skills for preparing and serving food and beverages Again, there is no direct link with this unit. However, learners may be able to appreciate how providing good food and beverage services can contribute to the local economy, providing a relationship with learning outcome 1 of Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important.

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Resources
Textbooks
Jones P: An Introduction to Hospitality, 2nd Edition (Thompson Learning 2002) ISBN: 0826460771 Holloway J: The Business of Tourism, 7th Edition (Financial Times/Prentice Hall 2006) ISBN: 0273701614 Gardiner J, Housley J: GCSE Hospitality and Catering: The Essentials (Hodder Arnold 2007) ISBN: 0340948396

Journals
Learners may also benefit from articles in the Caterer and Hotelkeeper – available from high street newsagents. Hospitality magazine is the professional publication for industry managers’ established or aspiring. Published by the newly-branded Institute of Hospitality, with a passionate take on all things influencing and driving change in hospitality, each quarter Hospitality reports on key issues affecting hotels and restaurants, contract caterers and SMEs.

Websites
www.bha.org.uk British Hospitality Association – the national trade association for hotels, restaurants and caterers British Institute of Innkeeping – the professional body for the licensed retail industry The industry’s leading hospitality job site, with a wide range of jobs advertised Caterer and Hotelkeeper industry journal Institute of Hospitality – the professional body for managers and aspiring managers working in the hospitality, leisure and tourism industries; aims to promote the highest professional standards of management and education in the international hospitality, leisure and tourism industries People 1st – The Sector Skills Council for the Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism industries; site contains research into key facts and figures and industry issues Schools Hospitality Project – introduces 11-18 year-olds to the UK’s hospitality industry and helps them learn about career paths within the industry; also introduces young people to the skills and attitudes employers look for.

www.bii.org

www.caterer.com

www.caterersearch.com www.instituteofhospitality.org/

www.people1st.co.uk

www.schoolsproject.co.uk

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www.springboarduk.org.uk

Theories and concept of human development and behavior

Applying promotional techniques

Springboard UK – industry-supported organisation which promotes careers in the industry and supports learning through the provision of learning materials for teachers British Tourist Authority – site contains considerable volume of information regarding industry data Visit Britain – the national tourism agency, promotes Britain internationally; aims to build the value of tourism to Britain and in England, generating wealth and jobs across Britain; site contains information regarding tourism destinations, travel and accommodation targeted at overseas visitors
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Level 1 Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important Guided Learning Hours: 30 (25 for teaching and learning activities, 5 for assessment activities)

Unit aims
The wider hospitality industry and the seven industries within it, provide a stimulating and challenging world for you to study and work in. Through this unit, you will learn how the everyday lives of people are affected by the important contribution the hospitality industry makes to the UK economy and the local community you live in. You will discover how the world of tourism can affect the hospitality industry, as well as the impact that factors such as major events or natural disasters can have. This unit will include plenty of opportunities for you to visit real hospitality establishments and businesses to build your knowledge and understanding of the industry. During these visits and other learning opportunities, you will also have an opportunity to talk to industry specialists about the hospitality industry and the jobs they do within it.

Assessment Method
This unit is internally assessed.
The assessment for this unit involves planning and reviewing activities to demonstrate the learner’s knowledge and skills. Learners will be expected to take responsibility for their own role and adapt behaviour accordingly. For further information about the requirements for this unit, including controls teachers must refer to the ‘Internal Assessment Specification’. EDI have produced sample assessment material to further specify the requirements for centres.

1

Learning Outcome

Learners will:

1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 1.1 Describe the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally. 1.2 Compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community. 1.3 Describe job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry

Learners need to develop understanding of the levels of revenue and employment generated by the hospitality industry on a local and national basis. This will include recognition that the level of employment opportunities reflects the growth of the hospitality industry. Furthermore, they develop their knowledge of how income from these jobs contributes to the economy by feeding back into businesses, for example: by providing jobs (front of house, such as; waiters, bar staff, event managers, receptionists and cruise line pursers and back of house, such as; chefs, maintenance, finance, marketing, human resources) by bringing visitors to the area (eg a local hotel targeting the business and conference market or a major sporting event bringing supporters from other areas) This should build on learners’ knowledge of the wider hospitality industry developed in unit 1, including the range of hospitality industries and the businesses within them. As well as contributing to the local economy, the hospitality industry is important to communities in various ways. Learners need to be able to compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community considering, for example, the importance of: providing venues for local people and visitors in the area to meet sourcing food and beverages through local providers supporting issues of local importance, such as developing tourism packages to support a local wildlife or hiking centre, sponsoring local clubs and societies supporting local schools by giving talks about hospitality and how it contributes to the local economy and community Learners need to explore and develop their understanding of real job roles that are undertaken in the local community across the range of hospitality industries. Additionally they should develop understanding of the earnings and rewards that the industry can offer including career progression and the chance to travel, both nationally and internationally.

2

Learning outcome

Learners will:

2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 2.1 Describe the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area. 2.2 Identify the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry.

Learners need to develop understanding of how the local hospitality industry can be affected by the tourism industry and its component parts including: visitor attractions – eg cultural and heritage sites, museums and galleries, theme parks, national parks, sporting venues, gardens, wildlife parks and zoos entertainment – eg sporting events, concerts, theatres, outdoor festivals facilities – eg transport (air/coach/train/taxi operators and associated terminals), Tourist Information Centres, travel agents and tour operators Learners should develop knowledge of how other factors affect both the local and national hospitality industry, for example: natural disasters – foreign tourists are reluctant to visit those areas affected transport links interrupted – flights delayed by poor weather causes guests to arrive late increase in demand for hotel rooms when major events are held locally the threat of terrorism in different countries and locations

A range of examples are included in this unit, however, this is not an exhaustive list and centres can use additional examples where appropriate.

3

Learning Outcome Learners will: 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 3.1 Use sources of information to answer questions.

Learners need to develop their skills in finding out about hospitality in the local area. Much of this can be investigative, including surveys of the area, visits to establishments and using the internet to explore websites. Other sources of information can include newspapers and magazines, local tourist information, libraries, trade and national press and publications, or professional associations such as People 1st – the Sector Skills Council for Hospitality. The information collected should build a picture of the local hospitality industry, including the range of industries that make it up, the services and products it offers and the range of job opportunities it can offer.

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Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important
At each level, the three bands indicate the differences in learner achievement. Assessors should use the information in the table to decide which mark band best describes a learner’s work, then, refer to the guidance to determine whether to place the mark at the top or bottom of the mark band. A compensatory system operates, where an item missing from one band can be compensated by work fulfilling the criteria for a higher band.

Band 3 The learner

Band 2 The learner

Band 1 The learner

Total

Learning Outcome 1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show some levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares some points showing the importance of some hospitality establishments to the local community. Describes points about some general job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes accurately the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of some hospitality establishments to some specific members of the local community. Describes some specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes in accurate detail the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of a range of hospitality establishments to a range of specific members of the local community. Describes in detail a range of specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

10

0-4 marks

5-7 marks

8-10 marks

5

Learning Outcome 2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show how tourism affects hospitality in the local area.

Describes some significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area.

Describes a range of significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area. Identifies a range of significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 8-10 marks Uses a range of sources of information appropriately to answer some questions independently. 10 10

Identifies some general factors which impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 0-4 marks

Identifies some significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 5-7 marks Uses some sources of information appropriately to answer some questions with limited support.

Learning Outcome 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Uses some sources of information to answer some questions with support.

0-4 marks Totals 12 9

5-7 marks 9

8-10 marks 30

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Guidance for Centres
Development Opportunities Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills EDI has embedded Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS) in specific assessment criteria within this unit. This is to ensure learners have the opportunity to develop these generic skills and competences within the context of learning experiences specifically related to the importance of the wider hospitality industry and the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs and events) that it comprises. The identification and application of specific PLTS within individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria also allow learners to plan and review their personal achievement and development. There are further opportunities for a range of PLTS to be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. The following sections highlight some of these additional opportunities for PLTS development and provide guidance for how these development opportunities can be implemented. Further information about PLTS and their application within the principal learning for the Diploma in Hospitality can be found in the guidance document.

Assessed PLTS
The following PLTS are assessed as part of the requirements of individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria and it is therefore necessary that they are delivered as part of the taught content.

Independent enquirers (IE2)
The outcome statement for this particular PLTS, as identified within AC3.1, requires young people to “plan and carry out research, appreciating the consequences of decisions”. In learning outcome 3, this is in relation to learners’ ability to use sources of information about hospitality. This particular assessment criterion assesses learners’ ability to research hospitality in the local area. Centres need to provide opportunities for learners to use an appropriate range of research methods and sources, for example to investigate the range of industries represented in the wider hospitality industry, or the range of job roles, including those that the learners themselves might wish to pursue.

Developed PLTS
There are a range of PLTS which can be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. Learners will have opportunities to develop their understanding of the importance of the wider hospitality industry during visits to local establishments and opportunities to talk to people who work in the industry. Therefore there are likely to be a wide range of opportunities to develop Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills. Some opportunities for PLTS development are highlighted below, although the examples listed do not form an exhaustive list.

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Independent enquirers (IE1, 4, 6)
This unit builds on Unit 1 and will frequently use a similar method of delivery (eg visits to industry). Centres can use these to help learners to develop their ability to identify questions to answer and problems to solve (IE1), for example asking questions of industry professionals as they research the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally (LO1, AC1.1). Centres can use this same assessment criterion to provide learners with opportunities to analyse and evaluate the information on revenue and employment they have found, judging its relevance and value (IE4). Learners will need to present their evidence and centres can help them to understand the importance of and build their ability to support their conclusions, using reasoned arguments and evidence (IE6).

Creative thinkers (CT1, 4, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to generate ideas and develop creative layouts (CT1) for presentations about their work, for example by preparing a display of their findings about job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry (LO1 AC1.3), or how tourism affects the wider hospitality industry in the local area (LO2 AC2.1). Centres can also encourage learners to ask questions to develop their thinking, particularly during visits to local establishments and presentations by local employers, for example on the importance of different establishments to the local community (LO1 AC1.2). Discussion groups following such visits or presentations are ideal vehicles for learners to develop the skills of questioning their own and others’ assumptions (CT4), particularly when working in new areas of knowledge and understanding such as comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.2). Learners will benefit from teachers’ feedback and may need to adapt their ideas about the industry (CT6) as their broader knowledge develops.

Reflective learners (RL2, 3, 5, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to set goals (RL2) with success criteria for their development and work. This can be achieved, for example, by setting a goal in relation to development of their knowledge of the effect of local tourism (LO2 AC2.1), such as a time frame for finding information or a format for presenting their findings. Using this same assessment criterion as an example, learners can benefit from reviewing their progress (RL3) through interim feedback from the teacher and acting on this to improve their knowledge and understanding of specific issues. This same approach (interim feedback) can also be used to develop the ability to evaluate their experiences and learning about the effect of local tourism in a way that informs their ongoing work (RL5). Presenting their findings to a group would use similar communications skills to those used during the feedback sessions, but learners can develop the ability to recognise their peers as a different audience and communicate their learning in a relevant way (RL6).

Team workers (TW1)
As with other units and areas of work, working in small groups can develop useful teamworking skills. Dividing learners into small groups each with a focus on a different 8

area of work – for example identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry, where different groups can focus on the range of hospitality industries – will help learners develop skills to collaborate with others and work towards common group goals (TW1).

Self managers (SM2, 3, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to work towards goals, showing initiative, commitment and perseverance (SM2), for example when comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.1), which for some learners could be a challenging task. Learners can take this forward, focusing on their ability to plan and manage their own activities (SM3), for example developing a plan that organises their time to help them research the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and presenting their findings to a group of other learners. Opportunities to develop their skills on responding positively to change, seeking advice and support when needed (SM6) can be geared to change in the industry itself, for example when considering factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2).

Effective participators (EP1, 5)
Centres can use this unit as an opportunity for learners to discuss issues of concern, seeking resolution where needed (EP1). This can be applied, for example, when identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2), where learners may need clarification and support on their findings. Centres can use the same opportunity to develop learners’ ability to influence others, negotiating and balancing diverse views to reach workable solutions (EP5). For example, they can consider the implications of a particular factor and how this may affect different stakeholders, as well as the hospitality industry.

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Functional Skills
Learners at this level must achieve ‘mastery’ in the functional skills of English, ICT and Maths at Level 1. ‘Mastery’ means that the learners are able to apply their skills in English, ICT and Maths at that level, in any situation related to living and working. Each functional skill has a separate, externally set and marked summative assessment. However, if learners are to acquire ‘mastery’ of the functional skills, it is preferable for them to be provided with integrated learning opportunities in which to demonstrate application of all 3 functional skills. In providing such opportunities, teachers will find it relatively easy to integrate English and some sections of ICT into projects, but integrating the functional skill of Maths will require more thought. However, prior to embarking on full projects, learners will need to practise demonstrating competence in applying functional skills during simple classroom exercises. Teachers should focus on the right hand column of the standards for the functional skills of Maths and English to ensure that learners achieve full coverage of the standards, ie ‘mastery’, and to ensure that they are prepared for the external summative assessment. With regard to ICT, however, the middle and right hand columns need to be covered.

Suggested activity
The activity below is an example of an activity which shows how functional skills can be developed through the delivery of this unit. There is no requirement for learners to complete the activity highlighted below and teachers may prefer to deliver the learning outcomes within this unit through other delivery strategies. However, teachers should refer to the following example as a specification for how functional skills can be addressed through delivery activities. Further information about how the unit may be delivered can be found in the delivery strategies section of this unit specification. Using the idea of mock interviews, learners should be invited to apply for a job in one of the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs; events), which they should agree with their teacher as part of the preparation for this activity. (The job role should be one that interests them and reflects their skills and attributes.)

Activity
Learners are required to: Look at their personal outgoings and identify the level of salary they require. They should then research the type of organisation in which they would like a job.

Functional skills addressed

ICTU1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5; 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 4.2, ICTFS1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 M1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, 1.9, 1.12, 1.13, 1.15. 1.16

10

Complete an application form for the job Prepare a CV A personal profile giving their reasons for wanting to join that organisation and listing their strengths/weaknesses etc Take part in mock interview

ICTD1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1. 3.1, 3.2, 4.2 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 EW1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5

ESL1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4

Legend
ICTU1.1= ICTFS1.1= ICTD1.1= M1.1= ESL1.1= ER1.1= EW 1.1= ICT 1.1 Use ICT systems ICT1.1 Find and select information ICT1.1 Develop, present and communicate information Maths 1.1 English speaking and listening 1.1 English reading 1.1 English writing 1.1

Please refer to the EDI Guidance for Centres, which gives tables showing the full list of learning outcomes for functional skills. The functional skills identified as being addressed are dependent upon the scope of the project as presented by the learner.

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Further Marking Advice
Glossary of Terms
Accurate The learner uses a description of revenue and employment which is factual and reflects a precise and exact picture or reflection of the situation.HND Assignment Help

Appropriate

The learner uses sources which will provide the information needed .

Compares

The learner examines and notes similarities or differences.

Describes in detail

The learner gives an account or representation of the levels of revenue and employment in words covering most key or significant points or issues in a coherent and organised way.

General

The learner makes correct points that relate to the factors impacting on the hospitality industry; however there will be little application to the actual situation presented.

Significant

Important in effect or meaning.

Specific

The learner refers to points that are in real existence, for example the job role will be a real one in a local establishment.

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Mark Scheme Exemplification
Mark Band
Mark Band 3 – Learners up to Pass level, meeting assessment criteria at lowest level.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 3 with some evidence missing, but compensated by some present in higher mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have only partly completed the evidence required or their work falls short of the required standard for the level. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 3, the learner needs only to describe points (this must be more than just a list), which may not be cohesive. The points are unlikely to be well organised, but should have some relevance to the importance of the hospitality industry. Some points are likely to be weak. Learners need to make some points about the importance of some establishments to the local community. Again, points may not be well organised, may be weak or have limited relevance. The establishments considered may be limited in number or type and will probably be limited to those the learner has visited or studied in case study materials. Learners must make some attempt at comparison, for example by commenting on the value to the community. Learners will have described a small number of job roles, but this will be in general terms, rather than referring to the work of real people in the industry. Learners need evidence that reflects their knowledge of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some simple points about how tourism affects the industry, such as the proximity of a local airport or a nearby Tourist Information Centre, but these may lack relevance. They need to identify factors affecting the local and UK industry in similar ways, for example agricultural problems such as foot and mouth. These again may lack relevance (eg little direct effect on a citycentre hotel). Learners will use some sources of information but they may interpret the information incorrectly or at a very superficial level when answering related questions. They will need direction from a teacher to complete the task.

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Mark Band
Mark Band 2 – Learners displaying understanding/skills beyond minimum required by assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 2 with some missing evidence compensated by evidence in a higher mark band. At the bottom of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have all the evidence required for mark band 3 but with one element of evidence for mark band 2. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 2, descriptions need to be accurate, for example reflecting a clear picture of the proportion of hospitality revenue against GDP, or the numbers employed in a particular job role. The comparison should reflect the similarities and differences of two or three hospitality establishments and why or how they are important to specific the local community. These may be one or two examples, such as providing discounted menus for a local pensioners group or sponsoring a local football team’s kit. Learners will have described a range of job roles and some of the roles described will demonstrate the work of real people in the industry. However, this standard will not be consistent and some of the job roles will only be described in general terms. Learners need evidence that reflects their understanding of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, such as the provision of accommodation, food and beverage services for tourists visiting a local attraction. They need to identify some factors affecting the local and UK industry that are significant, having a clear importance or relevance to the local area, such as a new factory opening that would need catering services. Learners will use a range of sources of information to answer questions, at times the information will be used appropriately but this standard will not be consistent. Learners will seek support from a teacher to carry out routine elements of the work.

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Mark Band
Mark Band 1 – Learners displaying understanding/skills at the highest level specified by the assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top of mark band 1, learners will have produced evidence to fulfil all of the requirements for the mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 1 it is likely that the learner will have produced all the evidence required for mark band 2 but with one element of evidence into mark band 1. Missing work in mark band 2 could be compensated by two elements in mark band 1. Learners need to provide a well-organised and detailed description of levels of employment and revenue at local and national level that is accurate and factually correct (guidance on structuring their evidence should ensure they are clear about this). The level of detail can be achieved by presenting evidence at industry level supported by evidence from their research (for example charts showing national employment distributions in different hospitality industries), then drawing information together into an overview. The comparison reflecting similarities and differences should cover a range of establishments from different hospitality industries, showing clearly why or how they are important to a range of specific members of the local community. This will be best achieved where the range of community members shows contrast. Large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will describe a range of job roles in terms of the work of real people in the industry in their local area. This standard will, unlike mark band 2 be fairly consistent and the description will include accurate detail. Learners need to describe significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, which should show clearly the relationship between the two industries, for example the provision of accommodation and parking packages to support tourists using a nearby airport. Similarly, they need to identify a range of factors affecting the local and UK industry, such as the growth of farmhouse accommodation provision as a result of declining agriculture. In both instances, large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will use a range of different sources effectively to answer questions. Support of a teacher will be sought to deal with challenging but not routine situations.

15

Control
This unit is subject to MEDIUM level control. Specified tasks should be completed under the supervision and control of the teacher. Further guidance about controls for the assessment of this unit can be found in the Internal Assessment Specification. EDI have also produced Sample Assessment Material to further specify the requirements for centres.

Guided Learning Hours
Within this unit GLH refers both to time for teaching and learning and time for assessment activities. For this unit 25 hours must be dedicated to teaching and learning activities and 5 must be used for assessment activities. Assessment is likely to be through a project or assignment requiring straightforward delivery of knowledge and understanding.

Employer Engagement
Experiencing the world of work is critically important for learners. It provides opportunities for learners to demonstrate that they are familiar with the hospitality industry and for this to be duly recognised through either practical performance or learning in a work-based hospitality environment as part of a work placement. Centres and individual teachers need to develop good relationships with the employers who have shown their willingness to contribute to delivery by supporting the Diploma Gateway process. Industry mentors can also add valuable input and support individual learners. Building solid relationships with the local hospitality industry is extremely important for this unit and an employer could be used to introduce learners to both the industry and the unit (this could be done in conjunction with Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works). Other opportunities for work-related learning can be maximised by arranging day or half-day trips to a range of establishments in different hospitality industries. This could involve a tour of the establishment with a manager, or by experiencing the establishment’s services as a customer. Such visits will add greatly to realism and vocational relevance. Learners can be provided with targeted websites from a wide range of organisations and establishments (large and small, privately and publicly owned) to investigate, either in general or focused on a specific issue. There are excellent opportunities to explore learners’ potential career development. Employers can also support teachers and the development of materials by providing real or simulated data relating to revenue, information about staff employment opportunities and turnover, information about any links they already have with the local community, copies of job descriptions or recent advertisements, examples of where they engage with the local tourism industry, and case study materials on factors that have impacted on their operation (either locally or nationally, if the establishment is part of a larger national chain). Employers can also contribute to classroom input where this is appropriate, such as by giving an introduction to the unit, or leading a discussion on learners’ findings. Employers are crucial to the assessment process. They can help to build assessment materials, commenting on their realism and relevance to the hospitality industry. Employers can also contribute to formative and summative assessment, for example by reviewing the evidence that learners have produced on the importance of the hospitality industry to the local economy or community, or by attending presentations by learners on the factors which impact on the hospitality industry and asking pertinent questions. 16

Delivery Strategies
This unit should relate to and complement the delivery of Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works, as well as contributing to development in other units. Its aim is to develop learners’ understanding of the importance of the hospitality industry, including levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally, the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also develop their knowledge of the factors which impact on the hospitality industry, including the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area and the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry. Other local examples might be the development of new housing provision, requiring additional hospitality support through pubs, restaurants, cafes and hotels, school meals and industrial canteens. Such a development would draw new people to the area, providing a wider group of potential customers. Similarly, the development or expansion of a local airport may increase the demand for hotel accommodation from travellers transiting in the local area. Learners should be encouraged to research the local area themselves and consider a range of local and national factors that will affect the industry they are studying. Visits to relevant hospitality establishments, setting practical and investigative tasks, and inviting visiting speakers to the centre can focus jointly on this unit and Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works.v

Planning a new business venture

Marketing principle and practice

Research project Such activities will underpin learners’ understanding of how hospitality contributes to the economy (1 in 5 of the new jobs created in the UK is in hospitality), how it can offer job opportunities and how it relates to the tourism industry. A short presentation to hospitality employers to show understanding of the industry would be an appropriate piece of formative and/or summative assessment. Witness statements would further testify to learners’ knowledge and understanding of the industry. This unit could be delivered as part of or as the complete extended project. The learner’s work experience could also be used as a vehicle for delivering the unit. Guidance materials need to be made available for learners so that they can continue to make appropriate career choices. Examples of how the unit could be delivered include: Visits to a selection of different hospitality businesses on a local basis to support learners’ understanding of the importance of hospitality establishments to the local community, for example: A local farm offering bed and breakfast accommodation (this could be combined with a talk on sourcing local produce) A small café or coffee shop operation (often dependent on visitors to the area for passing trade) A local stately home or other tourist attraction (providing opportunities to consider the hospitality industry’s relationship with tourism) A local sports club venue Discussions with invited speakers from local hospitality businesses to add vocational realism to issues such as levels of revenue and employment

17

Presentations from representatives of local organisations such as the Federation of Small Businesses or the Chamber of Commerce to underpin the importance of the hospitality industry to the local community Presentations by visiting tourism speakers to help hospitality learners relate to the tourism industry Group discussions of what experience learners have of the hospitality and tourism industries and how they relate to each other (this may be limited) Case studies that illustrate specific issues relating to the importance of the hospitality industry and the factors that can affect it Simple tests to underpin learning Active learning techniques that will promote understanding for various learning styles include: A chart showing the range of hospitality establishments in an area to illustrate how the industry contributes to local and national revenue and employment A log or diary of visits to hospitality establishments indicating how knowledge can contribute to evidence Research activities, for example to explore how the hospitality industry contributes to local and national revenue Using up-to-date resources to find out about the hospitality industry, such as trade journals, industry-focused websites and, in relation to the local industry, local newspapers/reports and People 1st (the Sector Skills Council for hospitality) Investigating local job opportunities in the hospitality industry and presenting them in a chart format to illustrate the range of job roles and hospitality establishments represented A personal statement of their experience of hospitality and/or tourism (either through visits or personal experience) Role-plays to explore different hospitality scenarios



The level of support required by a learner or the independence they can demonstrate will vary, differentiating learners from the least and most able.

Integrating units
For this unit to integrate with others, centre teams need to consider the structure of their programme and how integration of units can be most effective. This unit builds on Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works and will help learners to understand the importance of the hospitality industry, how it relates to the tourism industry and the range of factors that affect it. It will also integrate in limited ways with most other units in the Foundation Hospitality Diploma. Learners can develop skills and understanding and/or generate assessment evidence toward the following units:

Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works
This unit is externally assessed, which will impact on how learners develop their knowledge and understanding of the hospitality industry. Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important will broaden this knowledge and understanding and improve learners’ confidence when tackling the external assessment. 18

This unit will also support development of evidence for Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, particularly for learning outcome 1. Learners will be able to use their knowledge of the hospitality services provided by different job roles to identify those roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also be able to use their knowledge of hospitality services and the categories of establishments, providing them when they are developing their evidence for local issues and how these determine the importance of hospitality establishments to a local community. Learners can use their knowledge from this unit to build their knowledge of the factors affecting the UK hospitality industry and how it can be affected by tourism.

Unit 3: Introducing customer service in hospitality
Whilst not directly related to Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, this unit will help to provide a platform of knowledge that will help learners develop their evidence relating to the importance of the hospitality industry.

Unit 4: Developing skills for the hospitality industry
Learners will be able to use evidence from this unit focusing on teamworking and their understanding of different roles in the hospitality industry to help them identify job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. In reverse, learners’ knowledge of the importance of the hospitality industry gained through Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important can underpin the development of learners’ abilities as effective team members.

Unit 5: Introducing responsible food preparation
Links with this unit are more tenuous. It is possible for learners to make connections between the local economy and local issues (such as sourcing local foods and the overall impact on the environment) but this may stretch the capacity of Level 1 learners.

Unit 6: Introducing skills for preparing and serving food and beverages Again, there is no direct link with this unit. However, learners may be able to appreciate how providing good food and beverage services can contribute to the local economy, providing a relationship with learning outcome 1 of Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important.

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Resources
Textbooks
Jones P: An Introduction to Hospitality, 2nd Edition (Thompson Learning 2002) ISBN: 0826460771 Holloway J: The Business of Tourism, 7th Edition (Financial Times/Prentice Hall 2006) ISBN: 0273701614 Gardiner J, Housley J: GCSE Hospitality and Catering: The Essentials (Hodder Arnold 2007) ISBN: 0340948396

Journals
Learners may also benefit from articles in the Caterer and Hotelkeeper – available from high street newsagents. Hospitality magazine is the professional publication for industry managers’ established or aspiring. Published by the newly-branded Institute of Hospitality, with a passionate take on all things influencing and driving change in hospitality, each quarter Hospitality reports on key issues affecting hotels and restaurants, contract caterers and SMEs.

Websites
www.bha.org.uk British Hospitality Association – the national trade association for hotels, restaurants and caterers British Institute of Innkeeping – the professional body for the licensed retail industry The industry’s leading hospitality job site, with a wide range of jobs advertised Caterer and Hotelkeeper industry journal Institute of Hospitality – the professional body for managers and aspiring managers working in the hospitality, leisure and tourism industries; aims to promote the highest professional standards of management and education in the international hospitality, leisure and tourism industries People 1st – The Sector Skills Council for the Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism industries; site contains research into key facts and figures and industry issues Schools Hospitality Project – introduces 11-18 year-olds to the UK’s hospitality industry and helps them learn about career paths within the industry; also introduces young people to the skills and attitudes employers look for.

www.bii.org

www.caterer.com

www.caterersearch.com www.instituteofhospitality.org/

www.people1st.co.uk

www.schoolsproject.co.uk

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www.springboarduk.org.uk

Springboard UK – industry-supported organisation which promotes careers in the industry and supports learning through the provision of learning materials for teachers British Tourist Authority – site contains considerable volume of information regarding industry data Visit Britain – the national tourism agency, promotes Britain internationally; aims to build the value of tourism to Britain and in England, generating wealth and jobs across Britain; site contains information regarding tourism destinations, travel and accommodation targeted at overseas visitors
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Level 1 Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important Guided Learning Hours: 30 (25 for teaching and learning activities, 5 for assessment activities)

Unit aims
The wider hospitality industry and the seven industries within it, provide a stimulating and challenging world for you to study and work in. Through this unit, you will learn how the everyday lives of people are affected by the important contribution the hospitality industry makes to the UK economy and the local community you live in. You will discover how the world of tourism can affect the hospitality industry, as well as the impact that factors such as major events or natural disasters can have. This unit will include plenty of opportunities for you to visit real hospitality establishments and businesses to build your knowledge and understanding of the industry. During these visits and other learning opportunities, you will also have an opportunity to talk to industry specialists about the hospitality industry and the jobs they do within it.

Assessment Method
This unit is internally assessed.
The assessment for this unit involves planning and reviewing activities to demonstrate the learner’s knowledge and skills. Learners will be expected to take responsibility for their own role and adapt behaviour accordingly. For further information about the requirements for this unit, including controls teachers must refer to the ‘Internal Assessment Specification’. EDI have produced sample assessment material to further specify the requirements for centres.

1

Learning Outcome

Learners will:

1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 1.1 Describe the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally. 1.2 Compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community. 1.3 Describe job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry

Learners need to develop understanding of the levels of revenue and employment generated by the hospitality industry on a local and national basis. This will include recognition that the level of employment opportunities reflects the growth of the hospitality industry. Furthermore, they develop their knowledge of how income from these jobs contributes to the economy by feeding back into businesses, for example: by providing jobs (front of house, such as; waiters, bar staff, event managers, receptionists and cruise line pursers and back of house, such as; chefs, maintenance, finance, marketing, human resources) by bringing visitors to the area (eg a local hotel targeting the business and conference market or a major sporting event bringing supporters from other areas) This should build on learners’ knowledge of the wider hospitality industry developed in unit 1, including the range of hospitality industries and the businesses within them. As well as contributing to the local economy, the hospitality industry is important to communities in various ways. Learners need to be able to compare the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community considering, for example, the importance of: providing venues for local people and visitors in the area to meet sourcing food and beverages through local providers supporting issues of local importance, such as developing tourism packages to support a local wildlife or hiking centre, sponsoring local clubs and societies supporting local schools by giving talks about hospitality and how it contributes to the local economy and community Learners need to explore and develop their understanding of real job roles that are undertaken in the local community across the range of hospitality industries. Additionally they should develop understanding of the earnings and rewards that the industry can offer including career progression and the chance to travel, both nationally and internationally.

2

Learning outcome

Learners will:

2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Travel and tourism Management

Influences on health and social care organization 

Learners can: 2.1 Describe the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area. 2.2 Identify the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry.

Learners need to develop understanding of how the local hospitality industry can be affected by the tourism industry and its component parts including: visitor attractions – eg cultural and heritage sites, museums and galleries, theme parks, national parks, sporting venues, gardens, wildlife parks and zoos entertainment – eg sporting events, concerts, theatres, outdoor festivals facilities – eg transport (air/coach/train/taxi operators and associated terminals), Tourist Information Centres, travel agents and tour operators Learners should develop knowledge of how other factors affect both the local and national hospitality industry, for example: natural disasters – foreign tourists are reluctant to visit those areas affected transport links interrupted – flights delayed by poor weather causes guests to arrive late increase in demand for hotel rooms when major events are held locally the threat of terrorism in different countries and locations

A range of examples are included in this unit, however, this is not an exhaustive list and centres can use additional examples where appropriate.

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Learning Outcome Learners will: 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Assessment Criteria

Taught Content

Learners can: 3.1 Use sources of information to answer questions.

Learners need to develop their skills in finding out about hospitality in the local area. Much of this can be investigative, including surveys of the area, visits to establishments and using the internet to explore websites. Other sources of information can include newspapers and magazines, local tourist information, libraries, trade and national press and publications, or professional associations such as People 1st – the Sector Skills Council for Hospitality. The information collected should build a picture of the local hospitality industry, including the range of industries that make it up, the services and products it offers and the range of job opportunities it can offer.

4

Foundation Diploma in Hospitality
Unit 2 Why the hospitality industry is important
At each level, the three bands indicate the differences in learner achievement. Assessors should use the information in the table to decide which mark band best describes a learner’s work, then, refer to the guidance to determine whether to place the mark at the top or bottom of the mark band. A compensatory system operates, where an item missing from one band can be compensated by work fulfilling the criteria for a higher band.

Band 3 The learner

Band 2 The learner

Band 1 The learner

Total

Learning Outcome 1 Understand the importance of the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show some levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares some points showing the importance of some hospitality establishments to the local community. Describes points about some general job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes accurately the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of some hospitality establishments to some specific members of the local community. Describes some specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

Describes in accurate detail the levels of revenue and employment locally and nationally. Compares the importance of a range of hospitality establishments to a range of specific members of the local community. Describes in detail a range of specific job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry.

10

0-4 marks

5-7 marks

8-10 marks

5

Learning Outcome 2 Know about the factors which impact on the hospitality industry.

Describes points to show how tourism affects hospitality in the local area.

Describes some significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area.

Describes a range of significant ways that tourism affects the hospitality industry in the local area. Identifies a range of significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 8-10 marks Uses a range of sources of information appropriately to answer some questions independently. 10 10

Identifies some general factors which impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 0-4 marks

Identifies some significant factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry. 5-7 marks Uses some sources of information appropriately to answer some questions with limited support.

Learning Outcome 3 Be able to find out about hospitality in the local area

Uses some sources of information to answer some questions with support.

0-4 marks Totals 12 9

5-7 marks 9

8-10 marks 30

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Guidance for Centres
Development Opportunities Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills EDI has embedded Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS) in specific assessment criteria within this unit. This is to ensure learners have the opportunity to develop these generic skills and competences within the context of learning experiences specifically related to the importance of the wider hospitality industry and the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs and events) that it comprises. The identification and application of specific PLTS within individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria also allow learners to plan and review their personal achievement and development. There are further opportunities for a range of PLTS to be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. The following sections highlight some of these additional opportunities for PLTS development and provide guidance for how these development opportunities can be implemented. Further information about PLTS and their application within the principal learning for the Diploma in Hospitality can be found in the guidance document.

Assessed PLTS
The following PLTS are assessed as part of the requirements of individual learning outcomes and assessment criteria and it is therefore necessary that they are delivered as part of the taught content.

Independent enquirers (IE2)
The outcome statement for this particular PLTS, as identified within AC3.1, requires young people to “plan and carry out research, appreciating the consequences of decisions”. In learning outcome 3, this is in relation to learners’ ability to use sources of information about hospitality. This particular assessment criterion assesses learners’ ability to research hospitality in the local area. Centres need to provide opportunities for learners to use an appropriate range of research methods and sources, for example to investigate the range of industries represented in the wider hospitality industry, or the range of job roles, including those that the learners themselves might wish to pursue.

Developed PLTS
There are a range of PLTS which can be developed through the teaching and delivery of this unit. Learners will have opportunities to develop their understanding of the importance of the wider hospitality industry during visits to local establishments and opportunities to talk to people who work in the industry. Therefore there are likely to be a wide range of opportunities to develop Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills. Some opportunities for PLTS development are highlighted below, although the examples listed do not form an exhaustive list.

7

Independent enquirers (IE1, 4, 6)
This unit builds on Unit 1 and will frequently use a similar method of delivery (eg visits to industry). Centres can use these to help learners to develop their ability to identify questions to answer and problems to solve (IE1), for example asking questions of industry professionals as they research the levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally (LO1, AC1.1). Centres can use this same assessment criterion to provide learners with opportunities to analyse and evaluate the information on revenue and employment they have found, judging its relevance and value (IE4). Learners will need to present their evidence and centres can help them to understand the importance of and build their ability to support their conclusions, using reasoned arguments and evidence (IE6).

Creative thinkers (CT1, 4, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to generate ideas and develop creative layouts (CT1) for presentations about their work, for example by preparing a display of their findings about job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry (LO1 AC1.3), or how tourism affects the wider hospitality industry in the local area (LO2 AC2.1). Centres can also encourage learners to ask questions to develop their thinking, particularly during visits to local establishments and presentations by local employers, for example on the importance of different establishments to the local community (LO1 AC1.2). Discussion groups following such visits or presentations are ideal vehicles for learners to develop the skills of questioning their own and others’ assumptions (CT4), particularly when working in new areas of knowledge and understanding such as comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.2). Learners will benefit from teachers’ feedback and may need to adapt their ideas about the industry (CT6) as their broader knowledge develops.

Reflective learners (RL2, 3, 5, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to set goals (RL2) with success criteria for their development and work. This can be achieved, for example, by setting a goal in relation to development of their knowledge of the effect of local tourism (LO2 AC2.1), such as a time frame for finding information or a format for presenting their findings. Using this same assessment criterion as an example, learners can benefit from reviewing their progress (RL3) through interim feedback from the teacher and acting on this to improve their knowledge and understanding of specific issues. This same approach (interim feedback) can also be used to develop the ability to evaluate their experiences and learning about the effect of local tourism in a way that informs their ongoing work (RL5). Presenting their findings to a group would use similar communications skills to those used during the feedback sessions, but learners can develop the ability to recognise their peers as a different audience and communicate their learning in a relevant way (RL6).

Team workers (TW1)
As with other units and areas of work, working in small groups can develop useful teamworking skills. Dividing learners into small groups each with a focus on a different 8

area of work – for example identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry, where different groups can focus on the range of hospitality industries – will help learners develop skills to collaborate with others and work towards common group goals (TW1).

Self managers (SM2, 3, 6)
Centres need to provide learners with opportunities to work towards goals, showing initiative, commitment and perseverance (SM2), for example when comparing the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community (LO1, AC1.1), which for some learners could be a challenging task. Learners can take this forward, focusing on their ability to plan and manage their own activities (SM3), for example developing a plan that organises their time to help them research the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and presenting their findings to a group of other learners. Opportunities to develop their skills on responding positively to change, seeking advice and support when needed (SM6) can be geared to change in the industry itself, for example when considering factors that impact on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2).

Effective participators (EP1, 5)
Centres can use this unit as an opportunity for learners to discuss issues of concern, seeking resolution where needed (EP1). This can be applied, for example, when identifying the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry (LO2, AC2.2), where learners may need clarification and support on their findings. Centres can use the same opportunity to develop learners’ ability to influence others, negotiating and balancing diverse views to reach workable solutions (EP5). For example, they can consider the implications of a particular factor and how this may affect different stakeholders, as well as the hospitality industry.

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Functional Skills
Learners at this level must achieve ‘mastery’ in the functional skills of English, ICT and Maths at Level 1. ‘Mastery’ means that the learners are able to apply their skills in English, ICT and Maths at that level, in any situation related to living and working. Each functional skill has a separate, externally set and marked summative assessment. However, if learners are to acquire ‘mastery’ of the functional skills, it is preferable for them to be provided with integrated learning opportunities in which to demonstrate application of all 3 functional skills. In providing such opportunities, teachers will find it relatively easy to integrate English and some sections of ICT into projects, but integrating the functional skill of Maths will require more thought. However, prior to embarking on full projects, learners will need to practise demonstrating competence in applying functional skills during simple classroom exercises. Teachers should focus on the right hand column of the standards for the functional skills of Maths and English to ensure that learners achieve full coverage of the standards, ie ‘mastery’, and to ensure that they are prepared for the external summative assessment. With regard to ICT, however, the middle and right hand columns need to be covered.

Suggested activity
The activity below is an example of an activity which shows how functional skills can be developed through the delivery of this unit. There is no requirement for learners to complete the activity highlighted below and teachers may prefer to deliver the learning outcomes within this unit through other delivery strategies. However, teachers should refer to the following example as a specification for how functional skills can be addressed through delivery activities. Further information about how the unit may be delivered can be found in the delivery strategies section of this unit specification. Using the idea of mock interviews, learners should be invited to apply for a job in one of the seven hospitality industries (hotels; restaurants; pubs, bars and nightclubs; contract food service providers; hospitality services; membership clubs; events), which they should agree with their teacher as part of the preparation for this activity. (The job role should be one that interests them and reflects their skills and attributes.)

Activity
Learners are required to: Look at their personal outgoings and identify the level of salary they require. They should then research the type of organisation in which they would like a job.

Functional skills addressed

ICTU1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5; 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 4.2, ICTFS1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 M1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, 1.9, 1.12, 1.13, 1.15. 1.16

10

Complete an application form for the job Prepare a CV A personal profile giving their reasons for wanting to join that organisation and listing their strengths/weaknesses etc Take part in mock interview

ICTD1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1. 3.1, 3.2, 4.2 ER1.1, 1.2, 1.3 EW1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5

ESL1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4

Legend
ICTU1.1= ICTFS1.1= ICTD1.1= M1.1= ESL1.1= ER1.1= EW 1.1= ICT 1.1 Use ICT systems ICT1.1 Find and select information ICT1.1 Develop, present and communicate information Maths 1.1 English speaking and listening 1.1 English reading 1.1 English writing 1.1

Please refer to the EDI Guidance for Centres, which gives tables showing the full list of learning outcomes for functional skills. The functional skills identified as being addressed are dependent upon the scope of the project as presented by the learner.

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Further Marking Advice
Glossary of Terms
Accurate The learner uses a description of revenue and employment which is factual and reflects a precise and exact picture or reflection of the situation.

Appropriate

The learner uses sources which will provide the information needed .

Compares

The learner examines and notes similarities or differences.

Describes in detail

The learner gives an account or representation of the levels of revenue and employment in words covering most key or significant points or issues in a coherent and organised way.

General

The learner makes correct points that relate to the factors impacting on the hospitality industry; however there will be little application to the actual situation presented.

Significant

Important in effect or meaning.

Specific

The learner refers to points that are in real existence, for example the job role will be a real one in a local establishment.

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Mark Scheme Exemplification
Mark Band
Mark Band 3 – Learners up to Pass level, meeting assessment criteria at lowest level.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 3 with some evidence missing, but compensated by some present in higher mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 3 it is likely that learners will have only partly completed the evidence required or their work falls short of the required standard for the level. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 3, the learner needs only to describe points (this must be more than just a list), which may not be cohesive. The points are unlikely to be well organised, but should have some relevance to the importance of the hospitality industry. Some points are likely to be weak. Learners need to make some points about the importance of some establishments to the local community. Again, points may not be well organised, may be weak or have limited relevance. The establishments considered may be limited in number or type and will probably be limited to those the learner has visited or studied in case study materials. Learners must make some attempt at comparison, for example by commenting on the value to the community. Learners will have described a small number of job roles, but this will be in general terms, rather than referring to the work of real people in the industry. Learners need evidence that reflects their knowledge of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some simple points about how tourism affects the industry, such as the proximity of a local airport or a nearby Tourist Information Centre, but these may lack relevance. They need to identify factors affecting the local and UK industry in similar ways, for example agricultural problems such as foot and mouth. These again may lack relevance (eg little direct effect on a citycentre hotel). Learners will use some sources of information but they may interpret the information incorrectly or at a very superficial level when answering related questions. They will need direction from a teacher to complete the task.

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Mark Band
Mark Band 2 – Learners displaying understanding/skills beyond minimum required by assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top end of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have produced all the evidence required for this mark band. However, the mark grid is a compensatory model and therefore a learner might have a mark at the top of mark band 2 with some missing evidence compensated by evidence in a higher mark band. At the bottom of mark band 2 it is likely that learners will have all the evidence required for mark band 3 but with one element of evidence for mark band 2. Learners need to describe levels of both revenue and employment, both locally and nationally. For mark band 2, descriptions need to be accurate, for example reflecting a clear picture of the proportion of hospitality revenue against GDP, or the numbers employed in a particular job role. The comparison should reflect the similarities and differences of two or three hospitality establishments and why or how they are important to specific the local community. These may be one or two examples, such as providing discounted menus for a local pensioners group or sponsoring a local football team’s kit. Learners will have described a range of job roles and some of the roles described will demonstrate the work of real people in the industry. However, this standard will not be consistent and some of the job roles will only be described in general terms. Learners need evidence that reflects their understanding of the factors (including tourism) affecting local and UK hospitality. They should be able to describe some significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, such as the provision of accommodation, food and beverage services for tourists visiting a local attraction. They need to identify some factors affecting the local and UK industry that are significant, having a clear importance or relevance to the local area, such as a new factory opening that would need catering services. Learners will use a range of sources of information to answer questions, at times the information will be used appropriately but this standard will not be consistent. Learners will seek support from a teacher to carry out routine elements of the work.

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Mark Band
Mark Band 1 – Learners displaying understanding/skills at the highest level specified by the assessment criteria.

Exemplification
At the top of mark band 1, learners will have produced evidence to fulfil all of the requirements for the mark bands. At the bottom of mark band 1 it is likely that the learner will have produced all the evidence required for mark band 2 but with one element of evidence into mark band 1. Missing work in mark band 2 could be compensated by two elements in mark band 1. Learners need to provide a well-organised and detailed description of levels of employment and revenue at local and national level that is accurate and factually correct (guidance on structuring their evidence should ensure they are clear about this). The level of detail can be achieved by presenting evidence at industry level supported by evidence from their research (for example charts showing national employment distributions in different hospitality industries), then drawing information together into an overview. The comparison reflecting similarities and differences should cover a range of establishments from different hospitality industries, showing clearly why or how they are important to a range of specific members of the local community. This will be best achieved where the range of community members shows contrast. Large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will describe a range of job roles in terms of the work of real people in the industry in their local area. This standard will, unlike mark band 2 be fairly consistent and the description will include accurate detail. Learners need to describe significant ways in which tourism affects the industry, which should show clearly the relationship between the two industries, for example the provision of accommodation and parking packages to support tourists using a nearby airport. Similarly, they need to identify a range of factors affecting the local and UK industry, such as the growth of farmhouse accommodation provision as a result of declining agriculture. In both instances, large numbers of similar examples will not reflect range or gain extra marks. Learners will use a range of different sources effectively to answer questions. Support of a teacher will be sought to deal with challenging but not routine situations.

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Control
This unit is subject to MEDIUM level control. Specified tasks should be completed under the supervision and control of the teacher. Further guidance about controls for the assessment of this unit can be found in the Internal Assessment Specification. EDI have also produced Sample Assessment Material to further specify the requirements for centres.

Guided Learning Hours
Within this unit GLH refers both to time for teaching and learning and time for assessment activities. For this unit 25 hours must be dedicated to teaching and learning activities and 5 must be used for assessment activities. Assessment is likely to be through a project or assignment requiring straightforward delivery of knowledge and understanding.

Employer Engagement
Experiencing the world of work is critically important for learners. It provides opportunities for learners to demonstrate that they are familiar with the hospitality industry and for this to be duly recognised through either practical performance or learning in a work-based hospitality environment as part of a work placement. Centres and individual teachers need to develop good relationships with the employers who have shown their willingness to contribute to delivery by supporting the Diploma Gateway process. Industry mentors can also add valuable input and support individual learners. Building solid relationships with the local hospitality industry is extremely important for this unit and an employer could be used to introduce learners to both the industry and the unit (this could be done in conjunction with Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works). Other opportunities for work-related learning can be maximised by arranging day or half-day trips to a range of establishments in different hospitality industries. This could involve a tour of the establishment with a manager, or by experiencing the establishment’s services as a customer. Such visits will add greatly to realism and vocational relevance. Learners can be provided with targeted websites from a wide range of organisations and establishments (large and small, privately and publicly owned) to investigate, either in general or focused on a specific issue. There are excellent opportunities to explore learners’ potential career development. Employers can also support teachers and the development of materials by providing real or simulated data relating to revenue, information about staff employment opportunities and turnover, information about any links they already have with the local community, copies of job descriptions or recent advertisements, examples of where they engage with the local tourism industry, and case study materials on factors that have impacted on their operation (either locally or nationally, if the establishment is part of a larger national chain). Employers can also contribute to classroom input where this is appropriate, such as by giving an introduction to the unit, or leading a discussion on learners’ findings. Employers are crucial to the assessment process. They can help to build assessment materials, commenting on their realism and relevance to the hospitality industry. Employers can also contribute to formative and summative assessment, for example by reviewing the evidence that learners have produced on the importance of the hospitality industry to the local economy or community, or by attending presentations by learners on the factors which impact on the hospitality industry and asking pertinent questions. 16

Delivery Strategies
This unit should relate to and complement the delivery of Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works, as well as contributing to development in other units. Its aim is to develop learners’ understanding of the importance of the hospitality industry, including levels of hospitality revenue and employment locally and nationally, the importance of different hospitality establishments to the local community and job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also develop their knowledge of the factors which impact on the hospitality industry, including the effect of tourism on hospitality in the local area and the factors impacting on the local and UK hospitality industry. Other local examples might be the development of new housing provision, requiring additional hospitality support through pubs, restaurants, cafes and hotels, school meals and industrial canteens. Such a development would draw new people to the area, providing a wider group of potential customers. Similarly, the development or expansion of a local airport may increase the demand for hotel accommodation from travellers transiting in the local area. Learners should be encouraged to research the local area themselves and consider a range of local and national factors that will affect the industry they are studying. Visits to relevant hospitality establishments, setting practical and investigative tasks, and inviting visiting speakers to the centre can focus jointly on this unit and Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works. Such activities will underpin learners’ understanding of how hospitality contributes to the economy (1 in 5 of the new jobs created in the UK is in hospitality), how it can offer job opportunities and how it relates to the tourism industry. A short presentation to hospitality employers to show understanding of the industry would be an appropriate piece of formative and/or summative assessment. Witness statements would further testify to learners’ knowledge and understanding of the industry. This unit could be delivered as part of or as the complete extended project. The learner’s work experience could also be used as a vehicle for delivering the unit. Guidance materials need to be made available for learners so that they can continue to make appropriate career choices. Examples of how the unit could be delivered include: Visits to a selection of different hospitality businesses on a local basis to support learners’ understanding of the importance of hospitality establishments to the local community, for example: A local farm offering bed and breakfast accommodation (this could be combined with a talk on sourcing local produce) A small café or coffee shop operation (often dependent on visitors to the area for passing trade) A local stately home or other tourist attraction (providing opportunities to consider the hospitality industry’s relationship with tourism) A local sports club venue Discussions with invited speakers from local hospitality businesses to add vocational realism to issues such as levels of revenue and employment

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Presentations from representatives of local organisations such as the Federation of Small Businesses or the Chamber of Commerce to underpin the importance of the hospitality industry to the local community Presentations by visiting tourism speakers to help hospitality learners relate to the tourism industry Group discussions of what experience learners have of the hospitality and tourism industries and how they relate to each other (this may be limited) Case studies that illustrate specific issues relating to the importance of the hospitality industry and the factors that can affect it Simple tests to underpin learning Active learning techniques that will promote understanding for various learning styles include: A chart showing the range of hospitality establishments in an area to illustrate how the industry contributes to local and national revenue and employment A log or diary of visits to hospitality establishments indicating how knowledge can contribute to evidence Research activities, for example to explore how the hospitality industry contributes to local and national revenue Using up-to-date resources to find out about the hospitality industry, such as trade journals, industry-focused websites and, in relation to the local industry, local newspapers/reports and People 1st (the Sector Skills Council for hospitality) Investigating local job opportunities in the hospitality industry and presenting them in a chart format to illustrate the range of job roles and hospitality establishments represented A personal statement of their experience of hospitality and/or tourism (either through visits or personal experience) Role-plays to explore different hospitality scenarios



The level of support required by a learner or the independence they can demonstrate will vary, differentiating learners from the least and most able.

Integrating units
For this unit to integrate with others, centre teams need to consider the structure of their programme and how integration of units can be most effective. This unit builds on Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works and will help learners to understand the importance of the hospitality industry, how it relates to the tourism industry and the range of factors that affect it. It will also integrate in limited ways with most other units in the Foundation Hospitality Diploma. Learners can develop skills and understanding and/or generate assessment evidence toward the following units:

Unit 1: Introducing how the hospitality industry works
This unit is externally assessed, which will impact on how learners develop their knowledge and understanding of the hospitality industry. Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important will broaden this knowledge and understanding and improve learners’ confidence when tackling the external assessment. 18

This unit will also support development of evidence for Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, particularly for learning outcome 1. Learners will be able to use their knowledge of the hospitality services provided by different job roles to identify those roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. Learners will also be able to use their knowledge of hospitality services and the categories of establishments, providing them when they are developing their evidence for local issues and how these determine the importance of hospitality establishments to a local community. Learners can use their knowledge from this unit to build their knowledge of the factors affecting the UK hospitality industry and how it can be affected by tourism.

Unit 3: Introducing customer service in hospitality
Whilst not directly related to Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important, this unit will help to provide a platform of knowledge that will help learners develop their evidence relating to the importance of the hospitality industry.

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Unit 4: Developing skills for the hospitality industry
Learners will be able to use evidence from this unit focusing on teamworking and their understanding of different roles in the hospitality industry to help them identify job roles in the local area which are based in the hospitality industry. In reverse, learners’ knowledge of the importance of the hospitality industry gained through Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important can underpin the development of learners’ abilities as effective team members.

Unit 5: Introducing responsible food preparation
Links with this unit are more tenuous. It is possible for learners to make connections between the local economy and local issues (such as sourcing local foods and the overall impact on the environment) but this may stretch the capacity of Level 1 learners.

Unit 6: Introducing skills for preparing and serving food and beverages Again, there is no direct link with this unit. However, learners may be able to appreciate how providing good food and beverage services can contribute to the local economy, providing a relationship with learning outcome 1 of Unit 2: Why the hospitality industry is important.

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Resources
Textbooks
Jones P: An Introduction to Hospitality, 2nd Edition (Thompson Learning 2002) ISBN: 0826460771 Holloway J: The Business of Tourism, 7th Edition (Financial Times/Prentice Hall 2006) ISBN: 0273701614 Gardiner J, Housley J: GCSE Hospitality and Catering: The Essentials (Hodder Arnold 2007) ISBN: 0340948396

Journals
Learners may also benefit from articles in the Caterer and Hotelkeeper – available from high street newsagents. Hospitality magazine is the professional publication for industry managers’ established or aspiring. Published by the newly-branded Institute of Hospitality, with a passionate take on all things influencing and driving change in hospitality, each quarter Hospitality reports on key issues affecting hotels and restaurants, contract caterers and SMEs.

Websites
www.bha.org.uk British Hospitality Association – the national trade association for hotels, restaurants and caterers British Institute of Innkeeping – the professional body for the licensed retail industry The industry’s leading hospitality job site, with a wide range of jobs advertised Caterer and Hotelkeeper industry journal Institute of Hospitality – the professional body for managers and aspiring managers working in the hospitality, leisure and tourism industries; aims to promote the highest professional standards of management and education in the international hospitality, leisure and tourism industries People 1st – The Sector Skills Council for the Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism industries; site contains research into key facts and figures and industry issues Schools Hospitality Project – introduces 11-18 year-olds to the UK’s hospitality industry and helps them learn about career paths within the industry; also introduces young people to the skills and attitudes employers look for.

www.bii.org

www.caterer.com

www.caterersearch.com www.instituteofhospitality.org/

www.people1st.co.uk

www.schoolsproject.co.uk

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www.springboarduk.org.uk

Springboard UK – industry-supported organisation which promotes careers in the industry and supports learning through the provision of learning materials for teachers British Tourist Authority – site contains considerable volume of information regarding industry data Visit Britain – the national tourism agency, promotes Britain internationally; aims to build the value of tourism to Britain and in England, generating wealth and jobs across Britain; site contains information regarding tourism destinations, travel and accommodation targeted at overseas visitors
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