Unit 9: Manufacturing Planning and Scheduling Principles

 

Unit 9:

Manufacturing Planning and

 

 

Scheduling Principles


Unit code:
A/601/1480

QCF level:
5


Credit value:
15






Aim

This unit will develop learners’ understanding of the methodologies and techniques that are used in process planning and scheduling and will enable them to plan and schedule a manufacturing activity.

Unit abstract

Learners will develop an understanding of how manufactured products and their associated processes are planned, monitored and controlled and extend their knowledge of and ability to apply both manual and computer-assisted methods and procedures. The unit covers process plans (for example forecasting, network analysis, etc), capacity assessment and scheduling. This leads the learner into inventory management with stock control and documentation systems. The last two outcomes require the learner to examine group technology, process plans and production scheduling.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this unit a learner will:

1       Understand the use of process planning, capacity assessment and scheduling techniques

2       Understand inventory management including stock control, shop floor documentation systems and the functions of shop control

3       Understand the methods of classifying and coding component parts as key elements of group technology and their processing through grouped facilities

4       Be able to plan and schedule a manufacturing activity.


Unit content



1      Understand the use of process planning, capacity assessment and scheduling techniques

Process planning: forecasting; network analysis; critical path method (CPM); project evaluation and review technique (PERT); material requirement planning (MRP); equipment and tooling; make or buy decisions; computer aided-planning and estimating

Capacity assessment: bill of materials; economic batch size; assessment of load and capacity; effects of re-working and scrap; methods of increasing/decreasing capacity; time-phased capacity planning

Scheduling: lead times; critical path analysis (CPA); supplier and production schedules; Kanban; optimised production technology (OPT) philosophy; influence of scheduling on capacity planning dispatching; material requirement planning (MRP)


2      Understand inventory management including stock control, shop floor documentation systems and the functions of shop control

Inventory management: types of inventory; dependent and independent demand; role of buffer stock; cost of inventory

Stock control systems: periodic review; re-order points; two bin system; basic economic order quantities; Kanban

Documentation systems: works orders; routing document; job tickets; recording of finished quantities; re-work and scrap; stock records

Shop control: scheduled release of works orders; progressing; data collection and feedback


3      Understand the methods of classifying and coding component parts as key elements of group technology and their processing through grouped facilities

Classifying and coding: sequential; product; production; design; Opitz method; classification of parts into families

Grouped facilities: layout; product; process; fixed position; group; sequencing of families for groups of facilities

4      Be able to plan and schedule a manufacturing activity

Process plan: forecast to identify timings and completion dates; materials required; equipment and tooling required; methods or processes employed; labour requirements and planning for quality checks; proposal for data logging; use of computers; MRP

Production schedule: developed from the process planning and customer requirements; lead times; using scheduling techniques eg CPA, Gantt charts, software packages, OPT philosophy, MRP 

Learning outcomes and assessment criteria




Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass



On successful completion of

The learner can:



this unit a learner will:














LO1 Understand the use of

1.1
evaluate the use of three different process planning


process planning, capacity



techniques


assessment and scheduling

1.2
select and assess the use of a capacity assessment


techniques






technique for two different types of manufacturing












process




1.3
explain the use of a range of scheduling techniques








LO2 Understand inventory

2.1
explain an application of the principle of inventory


management including stock



management


control, shop floor

2.2
compare and evaluate two different stock control


documentation systems and






systems


the functions of shop control














2.3
discuss two different shop floor documentation systems




2.4
explain the functions of shop control







LO3 Understand the methods of

3.1
explain the methods of classifying and coding



classifying and coding


component parts into family groups



component parts as key

3.2
explain how family groups of components are



elements of group






sequenced for processing through grouped facilities



technology and their











processing through grouped






facilities











LO4 Be able to plan and schedule

4.1
produce a process plan from a given set of data


a manufacturing activity

4.2
produce a production schedule from a process plan.















Guidance



Links

This unit can be linked with Unit 8: Engineering Design, Unit 10: Manufacturing Process and Unit 15: Design for Manufacture.

The unit can also be linked to the SEMTA Level 4 National Occupational Standards in Engineering Management, particularly Unit 4.16: Schedule Activities for Engineering Methods and Procedures.

Essential requirements

Both manual records and relevant computer software of industrial standards will need to be available to enable realistic project and assignment work to be undertaken.

Employer engagement and vocational contexts

Liaison with industry should be encouraged in order to develop a valuable and relevant resource facility. Where possible, work-based experience should be used to provide practical examples of the planning and scheduling principles covered.









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