Unit 47 Engineering Plant Technology



Unit 47:

Engineering Plant Technology


Unit code:
F/601/1433

QCF level:
5


Credit value:
15






Aim

This unit will develop learners’ understanding of the operation and testing of engineering plant and the application of the related underpinning principles of operation.

Unit abstract

It is desirable that technicians and engineers who are concerned with the design, installation and operation of power generation plant and plant services have a broad-based practical and theoretical knowledge of the sector. Safe operating and testing procedures form an essential part of this knowledge base for those involved in the day-to-day running and servicing of plant equipment.

The aim of this unit is to investigate the relationships between theory and practice for the various items of plant. The first learning outcome aims to provide knowledge of safe operating and testing procedures. The second and third learning outcomes seek to give an understanding of the energy changes and energy flow, which occur in power generation and service plant. The final learning outcome is concerned with prime movers in the form of diesel engines, steam turbines and gas turbines. Its aim is to provide knowledge of the different configurations and an assessment of their performance.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this unit a learner will:

1       Understand procedures for safe and effective operation and testing of plant

2     Be able to apply the steady flow energy equation (SFEE) to plant and equipment

3       Be able to apply the principles of heat transfer to plant processes

4       Be able to analyse and report on the performance of power supply equipment.



Unit content


1      Understand procedures for safe and effective operation and testing of plant

Safe operating procedures: pre start-up checks; start-up; running and shutdown procedures; permit to work; emergency procedures

Testing procedures: performance monitoring eg collation of data and results, flow variables such as temperature, pressure, volume flow, abnormal conditions, quality control, corrective action; performance testing eg comparison of measured results with accepted norms for criteria such as power, efficiency, heat loss, power factor, slip


2      Be able to apply the steady flow energy equation (SFEE) to plant and equipment

SFEE: consideration and applications of continuity of mass; first law of thermodynamics; principle of conservation of energy; work flow; heat transfer; kinetic energy; potential energy; pressure-flow energy; internal energy; enthalpy

Application of SFEE to plant: assumptions made in specific applications; energy transfer and efficiency calculations for specific items of plant eg economisers, boilers, super-heaters, turbines, pumps, condensers, throttles, compressors; boiler efficiency


3      Be able to apply the principles of heat transfer to plant processes

Composite walls: overall heat transfer coefficient (U) for standard structures eg furnaces and refrigerators; k value applied to composite walls; interface temperatures; boundary layer effects on single layer walls; comparison of refrigerator casing with furnace walls

Heat exchangers: direct injection of water into steam; shell and tube designs; thin cylinder heat transfer; parallel and counter flow; casing losses; coefficient of performance of condensers

Pipes: comparison of heat losses through lagged and unlagged pipes; k values applied to thin and thick cylinders; optimum lagging thickness

4      Be able to analyse and report on the performance of power supply equipment

Diesel engines: specific applications of diesel engines and analysis of relevant performance parameters eg compression ratio, fuel cut-off ratio, air standard efficiency for low speed and medium/high speed diesel engines, engine trials, 2 and 4 stroke effect on output, indicated and brake mean effective pressure, indicated and brake power, indicated and brake thermal efficiency, mechanical efficiency, relative efficiency, specific fuel consumption

Steam turbines: measurement of power output; effect of temperature change across turbine; impulse and reaction principles; pass out; back pressure and condensing turbines; avoidance of wet steam; limitations on efficiency

Gas turbines: single and double shaft; regeneration and reheat; efficiency with and without regeneration; economics of gas turbine

Alternative energy sources: wind turbines, wave energy, waste recycling, geothermal


Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

Learning outcomes
Assessment criteria for pass

On successful completion of
The learner can:

this unit a learner will:







LO1 Understand procedures for
1.1
analyse and review safe operating and testing

safe and effective operation

procedures

and testing of plant
1.2
interpret data and results to produce written reports




1.3
compare test results with accepted norms





LO2 Be able to apply the steady
2.1
derive, from first principles, the steady flow energy

flow energy equation (SFEE)

equation

to plant and equipment
2.2
specify assumptions when applying SFEE to plant items




2.3
generate and apply specific equations based on stated



assumption to specific plant items





LO3 Be able to apply the
3.1
apply formulae involving U and k values to composite

principles of heat transfer to

walls

plant processes
3.2
realise the effect of boundary layers




3.3
apply heat transfer formulae to heat exchangers


3.4
compare heat losses through lagged and unlagged pipes





LO4 Be able to analyse and report
4.1
analyse and report on the performance of a diesel

on the performance of

engine

power supply equipment
4.2
analyse and report on the performance of a steam





turbine


4.3
analyse and report on the performance of a gas turbine.






Guidance
Links

This unit can be linked with Unit 2: Engineering Science and Unit 41: Fluid Mechanics.


Essential requirements

Centres need to provide access to suitable laboratory facilities for the investigation of energy transfer.

Employer engagement and vocational contexts


Liaison with employers would prove of benefit to centres, especially if they are able to offer access to suitable industrial plant and equipment.

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